2019 SOL SUMMARY

National Overview of Statutes of Limitation (SOLs) for Child Sex Abuse

2019 SOL Reform Legislation and Best Current Civil and Criminal SOLs

At a Glance:

 

PART I: OVERVIEW OF 2019 SOL REFORM BILLS

A. SOL Reform Laws Going into Effect in 2019

click here for summary of new sol reform laws in 23 states and D.C.
Alabama Extends the civil SOL for a sex offense against a person under 19 years of age to age 19 plus 6 years. (SB 11) (Governor Signed into Law on May 30, 2019).
Arizona Extends the civil SOL to age 30 and opens a 19-month revival window against perpetrators and institutions. (HB 2466) (Governor Signed into Law on May 27, 2019).
California Extends the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus 22 years, extends the discovery rule to 5 years, and opens a 3-year revival window. Also removes claim presentment requirement for claims against local public entities. (AB 218) (Governor Signed into Law on October 13, 2019).
Colorado Eliminates the criminal SOL for unlawful electronic sexual communication by a person in a position of trust with the minor. (HB 1030) (Governor Signed into Law on May 6, 2019).
Connecticut Extends the civil SOL for sexual abuse of a victim under age 21 to age 21 plus 30 years. Eliminates the criminal SOL for any felony or misdemeanor offense involving sexual abuse, sexual exploitation or sexual assault of a minor, including risk of injury involving intimate contact with a victim under age 16. Also, extends the criminal SOL for sexual abuse, sexual exploitation or sexual assault of victims age 18, 19, or 20 to age 51 and for sexual assault of a victim age 21 or older to 20 years from the offense for felonies and 10 years from the offense for misdemeanors. (SB 3) (Governor Signed into Law on June 18, 2019).
Illinois

Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony and misdemeanor sex offenses involving sexual conduct or sexual penetration, including misdemeanor criminal sexual abuse. (HB 2135) (Governor Signed into Law on July 26, 2019).

Extends the civil SOL by tolling the SOL during the time that victim is subject to fraudulent concealment. (SB 1868) (Governor Signed into Law on on August 20, 2019).

Indiana Extends the criminal SOL for sexual misconduct with a minor to age 31. (SB 551) (Governor Signed into Law on on April 18, 2019).
Iowa Extends the criminal SOL for the following felonies and misdemeanors to age of majority (18) plus 15 years: 1st, 2nd, and 3rd degree sexual abuse, incest, and sexual exploitation by a counselor, therapist, or school employee. (SF 589) (Governor Signed into Law on May 16, 2019).
Maine Extends the criminal SOL to 20 years from the offense for felony unlawful sexual contact or gross sexual assault of a victim age 16 or older. (SP 20/LD67) (Governor Signed into Law on June 27, 2019).
Montana Eliminates the criminal SOL for felonies and misdemeanors. Extends the civil SOL against perpetrators and institutions to the earlier of age 27 or 3 years after discovery that injury was caused by childhood sexual abuse. Opens a 1-year revival window on May 7, 2019 against institutions and perpetrators who are alive and have been convicted of or admitted to the abuse. (HB 640) (Governor Signed into Law on May 7, 2019).
Nebraska Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony sex trafficking of a minor and child pornography. (LB 519) (Governor Signed into Law on May 31, 2019).
Nevada

Eliminates the criminal SOL for a sexual assault arising out of the same facts as a murder. (SB 9) (Governor Signed into Law on May 16, 2019).

Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony sexual assault where the identity of an accused perpetrator is established by DNA evidence, regardless of victim’s age. (AB 142) (Governor Signed into Law on May 31, 2019).

New Jersey Extends the civil SOL for child sex abuse to age 55 or 7 years from discovery, whichever is later, for claims against individuals and public and private institutions. Removes claim presentment requirement for claims against public entities. Opens a 2-year revival window on December 1, 2019 for victims abused as minors or adults against perpetrators and institutions. Also, extends the civil SOL for adult sex assault victims to 7 years from the offense or 7 years from discovery, whichever is later. (S477) (Governor Signed into Law on May 13, 2019).
New York

Extends the criminal SOL for felony to age 28 and misdemeanor to age 25. Extends civil SOL to age 55 for claims against people and institutions. Also, removes 90-day notice of claim requirement for claims against public institutions. Opens a 1-year revival window on August 14, 2019 against perpetrators and institutions. (S 2440) (Governor Signed into Law on February 14, 2019).

Eliminates the criminal SOL for 1st degree incest and extends the criminal SOL for rape and criminal sexual act in the 2nd degree to age 43 and in the 3rd degree to age 33. (S 6574) (Governor Signed into Law on September 18, 2019).

North Carolina

Extends the civil SOL to age 28, opens a 2-year revival window, and adds a 2-year extension from criminal conviction for a related felony sexual offense for claims against a perpetrator. Also, extends the criminal SOL for misdemeanor crimes of abuse to 10 years. (SB 199) (Governor Signed into Law on November 7, 2019).

Extends the civil SOL for human trafficking, which includes sexual servitude, of a minor to age of majority (18) plus 10 years or of an adult to 10 years from the offense. (HB 198) (Governor Signed into Law on July 22, 2019).

North Dakota Extends the criminal SOL for felony and misdemeanor sex offenses to 21 years from the offense. (HB 1425) (Governor Signed into Law on March 21, 2019).
Pennsylvania

Eliminates the criminal SOL for the following child sex abuse felonies: trafficking, sexual servitude, rape, statutory sexual assault, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, sexual assault, institutional sexual assault, aggravated indecent assault and incest. Extends the criminal SOL for other felony and misdemeanor sexual offenses against minors to age 55. Also, extends the civil SOL to age 55 for victims sexually abused as minors and expands liability for government institutions by providing exceptions to the laws of government immunity and limitations on damages. Also extends the criminal and civil SOLs for young adult victims sexually abused at ages 18 to 23 by: extending the civil SOL to age 30, extending the criminal SOL to the later of 20 years after the offense or the current criminal SOL running from age 24, and adding a criminal DNA extension of 1 year after identification of perpetrator with DNA evidence. (HB 962) (Governor Signed into Law on November 26, 2019).

A resolution proposing an amendment to the Pennsylvania Constitution to add a 2-year revival window for victims of child sex abuse. (HB 963) (Passed in House and Senate, November 21, 2019).

Rhode Island Extends the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus 35 years and expands the 7-year delayed discovery rule to apply not just to the perpetrator but to all defendants. Also applies new SOL retroactively to claims against the perpetrator only. Expands liability for public entities by making new SOL applicable to them. (H5171 & S315) (Governor Signed into Law on July 1, 2019).
Tennessee Extends the civil SOL to age 33 with a 3-year delayed discovery rule. Eliminates the criminal SOL for child sex abuse felonies and misdemeanors, with a limitation that if prosecuting after victim is age 43, and victim was at or between ages 13 and 17 at the time of the offense, and victim never reported the offense to another person before reaching age 23, admissible and credible evidence corroborating the charge or similar acts by defendant is required. Also Eliminates the criminal SOL for rape and aggravated rape of an adult if reported within 3 years of the offense. (HB 565) (Governor Signed into Law on May 24, 2019).
Texas Extends the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus 30 years against perpetrators and institutions. (HB 3809) (Governor Signed into Law on June 14, 2019).
Utah

Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony human trafficking of a child, which includes trafficking for sexual exploitation of the child. (HB 20) (Governor Signed into Law on March 21, 2019).

Extends the criminal SOL for felony crimes where the SOL has run as of May 5, 2003 and no charges had been filed, by extending the time from 1 to 4 years that a prosecution must be commenced after a perpetrator has been identified by DNA evidence. (HB 192) (Governor Signed into Law on March 25, 2019).

Waives governmental immunity for civil claims of negligence or injury resulting from sexual battery against a student by a school employee, in a position of trust, who is criminally charged, that the school knew or should have known was a sex offender. Also, extends the civil SOL for claims against a governmental entity or its employee to 2 years after a claim arises or discovery of a claim. (HB 311) (Governor Signed into Law on March 25, 2019).

Vermont

Eliminates the civil SOL and revives all expired claims against perpetrators and negligent institutions. (HB 330) (Governor Signed into Law on May 28, 2019).

Eliminates the criminal SOL for sexual exploitation of a minor. (HB 511) (Governor Signed into Law on May 30, 2019).

Washington

Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony rape, sexual misconduct, child molestation, and sexual exploitation of a minor and extends the criminal SOL to 20 years from the offense for rape and indecent liberties, regardless of victim’s age. (SB 5649) (Governor Signed into Law on April 19, 2019).

Extends the criminal SOL for felony sex offenses by extending when the SOL begins to run to 2 years from identification of perpetrator by DNA, regardless of victim’s age. (HB 1166) (Governor Signed into Law on April 23, 2019).

Washington D.C. Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony sexual abuse, child sexual abuse, sexual abuse of a minor, and incest. Extends the civil SOL where victim was under age 35 to age 40 with a 5-year discovery rule. Also, opens a 2-year revival window for victims abused as minors or adults on May 3, 2019. (B22-0021/DC Act 22-593/L22-0311) (Law Effective on May 3, 2019).
Total Twenty-three (23) States and Washington D.C. with SOL Reform Going into Effect

 

B. SOL Reform Bills Passed in Legislature in 2019

Click here for summary of SOL reform bills in 24 states and D.C. that PASSED IN legislature
Alabama Extends the civil SOL for a sex offense against a person under 19 years of age to age 19 plus 6 years. (SB 11) (Governor Signed into Law on May 30, 2019).
Arizona Extends the civil SOL to age 30 and opens a 19-month revival window against people and institutions. (HB 2466) (Governor Signed into Law on May 27, 2019).
California Extends the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus 22 years, extends the discovery rule to 5 years, and opens a 3-year revival window. Also removes claim presentment requirement for claims against local public entities. (AB 218) (Governor Signed into Law on October 13, 2019).
Colorado Eliminates the criminal SOL for unlawful electronic sexual communication by a person in a position of trust with the minor. (HB 1030) (Governor Signed into Law on May 6, 2019).
Connecticut Extends the civil SOL for sexual abuse of a victim under age 21 to age 21 plus 30 years. Eliminates the criminal SOL for any felony or misdemeanor offense involving sexual abuse, sexual exploitation or sexual assault of a minor, including risk of injury involving intimate contact with a victim under age 16. Also, extends the criminal SOL for sexual abuse, sexual exploitation or sexual assault of victims age 18, 19, or 20 to age 51 and for sexual assault of a victim age 21 or older to 20 years from the offense for felonies and 10 years from the offense for misdemeanors. (SB 3) (Governor Signed into Law on June 18, 2019).
Illinois

Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony and misdemeanor sex offenses involving sexual conduct or sexual penetration, including misdemeanor criminal sexual abuse. (HB 2135) (Governor Signed into Law on July 26, 2019).

Extends the civil SOL by tolling the SOL during the time that victim is subject to fraudulent concealment. (SB 1868) (Governor Signed into Law on August 20, 2019).

Indiana Extends the criminal SOL for sexual misconduct with a minor to age 31. (SB 551) (Governor Signed into Law on on April 18, 2019).
Iowa Extends the criminal SOL for the following felonies and misdemeanors to age of majority (18) plus 15 years: 1st, 2nd, and 3rd degree sexual abuse, incest, and sexual exploitation by a counselor, therapist, or school employee. (SF 589) (Governor Signed into Law on May 16, 2019).
Maine Extends the criminal SOL to 20 years from the offense for felony unlawful sexual contact or gross sexual assault of a victim age 16 or older. (SP 20/LD67) (Governor Signed into Law on June 27, 2019).
Montana Eliminates the criminal SOL for felonies and misdemeanors. Extends the civil SOL against perpetrators and institutions to the earlier of age 27 or 3 years after discovery that injury was caused by childhood sexual abuse. Opens a 1-year revival window on May 7, 2019 against institutions and perpetrators who are alive and have been convicted of or admitted to the abuse. (HB 640) (Governor Signed into Law on May 7, 2019).
Nebraska Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony sex trafficking of a minor and child pornography. (LB 519) (Governor Signed into Law on May 31, 2019).
Nevada

Eliminates the criminal SOL for a sexual assault arising out of the same facts as a murder. (SB 9) (Governor Signed into Law on May 16, 2019).

Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony sexual assault where the identity of an accused perpetrator is established by DNA evidence, regardless of victim’s age. (AB 142) (Governor Signed into Law on May 31, 2019).

New Jersey Extends the civil SOL for child sex abuse to age 55 or 7 years from discovery, whichever is later, for claims against individuals and public and private institutions. Removes claim presentment requirement for claims against public entities. Opens a 2-year revival window on December 1, 2019 for victims abused as minors or adults against perpetrators and institutions. Also, extends the civil SOL for adult sex assault victims to 7 years from the offense or 7 years from discovery, whichever is later. (S477) (Governor Signed into Law on May 13, 2019).
New Mexico Would extend the criminal SOL for the following felonies committed against minors to age 30: abandonment and abuse, criminal sexual contact, and criminal sexual penetration. (SB 55) (Governor Vetoed on March 16, 2019).
New York

Extends the criminal SOL for felony to age 28 and misdemeanor to age 25. Extends civil SOL to age 55 for claims against people and institutions. Also, removes 90-day notice of claim requirement for claims against public institutions. Opens a 1-year revival window on August 14, 2019 against perpetrators and institutions. (S 2440) (Governor Signed into Law on February 14, 2019).

Eliminates the criminal SOL for 1st degree incest and extends the criminal SOL for rape and criminal sexual act in the 2nd degree to age 43 and in the 3rd degree to age 33. (S 6574) (Governor Signed into Law on September 18, 2019).

North Carolina

Extends the civil SOL to age 28, opens a 2-year revival window, and adds a 2-year extension from criminal conviction for a related felony sexual offense for claims against a perpetrator. Also, extends the criminal SOL for misdemeanor crimes of abuse to 10 years. (SB 199) (Governor Signed into Law on November 7, 2019).

Extends the civil SOL for human trafficking, which includes sexual servitude, of a minor to age of majority (18) plus 10 years and of an adult to 10 years from the offense. (HB 198) (Governor Signed into Law on July 22, 2019).

North Dakota Extends the criminal SOL for felony and misdemeanor sex offenses to 21 years from the offense. (HB 1425) (Governor Signed into Law on March 21, 2019).
Pennsylvania

Eliminates the criminal SOL for the following child sex abuse felonies: trafficking, sexual servitude, rape, statutory sexual assault, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, sexual assault, institutional sexual assault, aggravated indecent assault and incest. Extends the criminal SOL for other felony and misdemeanor sexual offenses against minors to age 55. Also, extends the civil SOL to age 55 for victims sexually abused as minors and expands liability for government institutions by providing exceptions to the laws of government immunity and limitations on damages. Also extends the criminal and civil SOLs for young adult victims sexually abused at ages 18 to 23 by: extending the civil SOL to age 30, extending the criminal SOL to the later of 20 years after the offense or the current criminal SOL running from age 24, and adding a criminal DNA extension of 1 year after identification of perpetrator with DNA evidence. (HB 962) (Governor Signed into Law on November 26, 2019).

A resolution proposing an amendment to the Pennsylvania Constitution to add a 2-year revival window for victims of child sex abuse. (HB 963) (Passed in House and Senate, November 21, 2019).

Rhode Island Extends the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus 35 years and expands the 7-year delayed discovery rule to apply not just to the perpetrator but to all defendants. Also applies new SOL retroactively to claims against the perpetrator only. Expands liability for public entities by making new SOL applicable to them. (H5171 & S315) (Governor Signed into Law on July 1, 2019).
Tennessee Extends the civil SOL to age 33 with a 3-year delayed discovery rule. Eliminates the criminal SOL for child sex abuse felonies and misdemeanors, with a limitation that if prosecuting after victim is age 43, and victim was at or between ages 13 and 17 at the time of the offense, and victim never reported the offense to another person before reaching age 23, admissible and credible evidence corroborating the charge or similar acts by defendant is required. Also Eliminates the criminal SOL for rape and aggravated rape of an adult if reported within 3 years of the offense. (HB 565) (Governor Signed into Law on May 24, 2019).
Texas Extends the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus 30 years against perpetrators and institutions. (HB 3809) (Governor Signed into Law on June 14, 2019).
Utah

Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony human trafficking of a child, which includes trafficking for sexual exploitation of the child. (HB 20) (Governor Signed into Law on March 21, 2019).

Extends the criminal SOL for felony crimes where the SOL has run as of May 5, 2003 and no charges had been filed, by extending the time from 1 to 4 years that a prosecution must be commenced after a perpetrator has been identified by DNA evidence. (HB 192) (Governor Signed into Law on March 25, 2019).

Waives governmental immunity for civil claims of negligence or injury resulting from sexual battery against a student by a school employee, in a position of trust, who is criminally charged, that the school knew or should have known was a sex offender. Also, extends the civil SOL for claims against a governmental entity or its employee to 2 years after a claim arises or discovery of a claim. (HB 311) (Governor Signed into Law on March 25, 2019).

Vermont

Eliminates the civil SOL and revives all expired claims against perpetrators and negligent institutions. (HB 330) (Governor Signed into Law on May 28, 2019).

Eliminates the criminal SOL for sexual exploitation of a minor. (HB 511) (Governor Signed into Law on May 30, 2019).

Washington

Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony rape, sexual misconduct, child molestation, and sexual exploitation of a minor and extends the criminal SOL to 20 years from the offense for rape and indecent liberties, regardless of victim’s age. (SB 5649) (Governor Signed into Law on April 19, 2019).

Extends the criminal SOL for felony sex offenses by extending when the SOL begins to run to 2 years from identification of perpetrator by DNA, regardless of victim’s age. (HB 1166) (Governor Signed into Law on April 23, 2019).

Washington D.C. Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony sexual abuse, child sexual abuse, sexual abuse of a minor, and incest. Extends the civil SOL where victim was under age 35 to age 40 with a 5-year discovery rule. Also, opens a 2-year revival window for victims abused as minors or adults on May 3, 2019. (B22-0021/DC Act 22-593/L22-0311) (Law Effective on May 3, 2019).
Total Twenty-four (24) States and Washington D.C. Passed SOL Reform

 

C. SOL Reform Bills Introduced in Legislature in 2019

click here for summary of sol reform bills in 40 states and D.C. that were Introduced in Legislature
Alabama Extends the civil SOL for a sex offense against a person under 19 years of age to age 19 plus 6 years. Previous version of bill would have extended the civil SOL to 10 years from offense, age 19 plus 10 years, or 10 years from criminal conviction, and add a 10 year delayed discovery rule. (SB 11 & HB 311) (SB 11 Governor Signed into Law on May 30, 2019) (HB 311 Hearing on April 10, 2019).
Arizona

Extends the civil SOL to age 30 and opens a 19-month revival window against perpetrators and institutions. (HB 2466) (Governor Signed into Law on May 27, 2019).

Would extend the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus 7 years or 7 years after disclosure to medical or mental health provider. Would also apply to actions for failure to report. (SB 1255) (Failed in Committee, February 21, 2019). Amended bill would extend the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus 12 years and open a 1-year revival window. (SB 1101) (Failed in House, April 4, 2019).

Would extend the civil SOL for sexual assault of a minor and failure to report to age of majority (18) plus 12 years, and if a defendant is charged with a crime after victim is age 30, would add 1 year from the final disposition of criminal proceeding. (HB 2746).

California Extends the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus 22 years, extends the discovery rule to 5 years and opens a 3-year revival window. Also, removes claim presentment requirement for claims against local public entities. (AB 218) (Governor Signed into Law on October 13, 2019).
Colorado Eliminates the criminal SOL for unlawful electronic sexual communication by a person in a position of trust with the minor. (HB 1030) (Governor Signed into Law on May 6, 2019).
Connecticut

Extends the civil SOL for sexual abuse of a victim under age 21 to age 21 plus 30 years. Eliminates the criminal SOL for any felony or misdemeanor offense involving sexual abuse, sexual exploitation or sexual assault of a minor, including risk of injury involving intimate contact with a victim under age 16. Also, extends the criminal SOL for sexual abuse, sexual exploitation or sexual assault of victims age 18, 19, or 20 to age 51 and for sexual assault of a victim age 21 or older to 20 years from the offense for felonies and 10 years from the offense for misdemeanors. Previous versions proposed to eliminate the civil SOL and open a 27-month revival window and eliminate or extend the criminal SOL for felony risk of injury to children offense and felony and misdemeanor sexual assault, regardless of victim’s age. Prior amended bill proposed to retroactively extend the civil SOL for sexual abuse of a victim under age 21 to age 21 plus 30 years, but exclude the revival window. (SB 3) (Governor Signed into Law on June 18, 2019).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for felony and misdemeanor. (HB 5534).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for felony and require school districts to require parents or guardians to watch a sexual assault prevention program. (SB 502).

Would extend or eliminate the criminal SOL for sexual assault, regardless of victim’s age. (HB 6505).

Would extend the criminal SOL for sexual assault, regardless of victim’s age. (HB 6297 & HB 5221).

Would extend the criminal SOL for sexual assault to 10 years from the offense, regardless of victim’s age. (SB 913) (Hearing on April 1, 2019, Passed out of Judiciary Comm., April 10, 2019).

Florida

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for sexual battery. (2020 Pre-filed SB 170 & HB 199) (SB 170 Passed out of Senate Criminal Justice Comm., October 22, 2019).

Would eliminate the civil SOL for sexual offenses, regardless of victim’s age. (2020 Pre-filed HB 277).

Would extend the civil SOL to age 55. (HB 53) (Withdrawn prior to Introduction September 20, 2019).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for 2nd, and 3rd degree felony sexual battery. (HB 395 & SB 130) (Failed, May 3, 2019).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd degree felony sexual battery, regardless of victim’s age. (HB 165) (Failed, May 3, 2019).

Would extend the criminal SOL for first and second-degree felony sexual battery of a victim age 16 or older to age of majority (18) plus 15 years. (SB 606 & HB 83) (SB 606 Withdrawn from Consideration, March 21, 2019) (HB 83 Failed, May 3, 2019).

Georgia

Would extend the civil SOL to age 55, extend the delayed discovery rule to 4 years, and open a 2-year revival window. (HB 418 & SB 228).

Would extend the civil SOL to age 38, extend the delayed discovery rule to 4 years, and open a 1-year revival window. (HB 479).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for felony and misdemeanors against victims under age 16. (HB 258).

Hawaii

Would eliminate the civil SOL. Senate amendment changes the effective date from January 28, 2081 to “upon its approval”. (HB 18) (Passed in House, March 1, 2019, Amended Bill Passed in Senate, April 9, 2019, House Disagrees with Amendment, April 11, 2019, House Deferred, April 26, 2019).

Would extend the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus 22, and add a 10-year delayed discovery rule. Amended bill eliminates the civil SOL. (SB 1035) (Passed in Senate, March 5, 2019).

Would extend the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus 22, and add a 10-year delayed discovery rule. (HB 482).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for sex trafficking and promoting prostitution, regardless of victim’s age. (HB 486, HB 233 & SB 478) (HB 233 Hearing on February 11, 2019, Judiciary Comm. Deferred on February 13, 2019) (HB 486 Amended to Exclude SOL Elimination, Passed in Senate, April 9, 2019).

Illinois

Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony and misdemeanor sex offenses involving sexual conduct or sexual penetration, including misdemeanor criminal sexual abuse. (HB 2135) (Governor Signed into Law on July 26, 2019).

Extends the civil SOL by tolling the SOL during the time that victim is subject to fraudulent concealment. Previous version proposed extending the civil SOL by tolling the SOL for 5 years if the perpetrator holds a position of trust, authority, or supervision and he/she conceals a cause of action from the victim. (SB 1868) (Governor Signed into Law on August 20, 2019).

Indiana

Extends the criminal SOL for sexual misconduct with a minor to age 31. (SB 551) (Governor Signed into Law on on April 18, 2019).

Would open a 3-year revival window. Amended bill excludes revival window and instead urges Legislative Counsel to assign the study of civil SOL to a summer committee. (SB 219) (Passed in Senate, February 20, 2019).

Iowa

Extends the criminal SOL for the following felonies and misdemeanors to age of majority (18) plus 15 years: 1st, 2nd, and 3rd degree sexual abuse, incest, and sexual exploitation by a counselor, therapist, or school employee. (SF 589, HB 729/HSB 237 & SB 405) (SF 589 Governor Signed into Law on May 16, 2019) (HB 729 Substituted with SF 589 and Withdrawn, April 23, 2019).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for the following felonies and misdemeanors: 1st, 2nd, and 3rd degree sexual abuse, incest, sexual exploitation by a counselor, therapist, or school employee, other sexual offenses, kidnapping, and human trafficking. (SF 92). Would eliminate the criminal SOL for felony and misdemeanor sexual offenses against minors and extend the criminal SOL for sexual abuse of non-minors, kidnapping and human trafficking to 3 years from identification of perpetrator by DNA. (SF 487).

Would eliminate the civil SOL for future conduct, extend the civil SOL to 5 years from effective date for prior conduct, and toll the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus one year for actions against municipalities. (SF 189).

Kansas Would eliminate the civil SOL. (HB 2306).
Kentucky Would eliminate the criminal SOL for misdemeanor sexual offenses, including but not limited to, sexual abuse, pornography, and attempted human trafficking. Would also eliminate the civil SOL. (HB 101 & HB 102).
Louisiana Would extend the criminal SOL for felony sex offenses when the victim is under age 17 by adding a 15-year extension to the current SOL of 30 years from age of majority (18) if new and material evidence is discovered before the 30-year SOL expires. Would also extend the criminal SOL for felony sex offenses when the victim is age 17 or older to 10 years with a 15-year extension if new and material evidence is discovered before the 10 year SOL expires. (HB 268) (Passed in House, May 23, 2019, Passed out of Senate Comm., June 4, 2019).
Maine

Extends the criminal SOL to 20 years from the offense for felony unlawful sexual contact or gross sexual assault of a victim age 16 or older. (SP 20/LD67) (Governor Signed into Law on June 27, 2019).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for Class A, B, or C crime involving incest, unlawful sexual contact, sexual abuse of a minor, rape or gross sexual assault of victims age 16 and older at the time of crime. (HP 257/LD332) (Failed, March 28, 2019).

Maryland

Would eliminate the civil SOL. Amended bill adds 2-year revival window. (HB 687). (Passed in House 136-2, March 18, 2019, Senate Hearing on March 28, 2019, Failed in Senate Judiciary Comm. 5-5, April 3, 2019).

Amended bill would extend the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus 40 years and open a 2-year revival window. Further amended bill removes provisions relating to SOLs and revival and only relates to violence against pregnant women. (SB 561) (Signed into Law on May 13, 2019).

Massachusetts

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for rape and indecent assault and battery. (S.980 & H.3309) (Joint Judiciary Comm. Hearing on December 3, 2019).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL if there is DNA evidence. (S.991) (Joint Judiciary Comm. Hearing on December 3, 2019).

Would extend the civil SOL for negligent supervision when the person who sexually abused the minor is deceased. (S.920) (Joint Judiciary Comm. Hearing on December 3, 2019).

Minnesota Would eliminate the criminal SOL for felony sexual offenses, regardless of victim’s age. (HF 480, SF 731, SF 2521 & HF 734) (HF 480 & HF 734 Hearing on March 13, 2019).
Mississippi

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for sexual battery. (SB 2377 & SB 2035).

Would eliminate the civil SOL. (HB 1379) (All Bills Failed in Committee, February 5, 2019).

Missouri Would extend the criminal SOL for the remaining sexual offenses that the SOL has not already been eliminated for, to 10 years from the offense if victim reported it within 3 years, or 3 years from the offense if victim did not report it, regardless of victim’s age. (HB 760).
Montana

Eliminates the criminal SOL for felonies and misdemeanors. Extends the civil SOL against perpetrators and institutions to the earlier of age 27 or 3 years after discovery that injury was caused by childhood sexual abuse. Opens a 1-year revival window against institutions and perpetrators who are alive and have been convicted of or admitted to the abuse. (HB 640) (Governor Signed into Law on May 7, 2019).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for felony and misdemeanor sex offenses. (HB 109) (Hearing on January 16, 2019 and Failed, April 25, 2019).

Would eliminate the civil SOL. (HB 202) (Hearing on January 18, 2019 and Failed, April 25, 2019). Would extend the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus 20 years. (HB 188) (Hearing on January 22, 2019 and Failed, April 25, 2019).

Would extend the criminal SOL for the following felonies to age of majority (18) plus 20 years for minor victims and 10 years after the offense for victims age 18 and older: incest, aggravated sexual intercourse without consent, promoting prostitution, aggravated promoting prostitution, sexual servitude and patronizing victim of sexual servitude. (HB 701) (Failed, April 25, 2019).

Nebraska

Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony sex trafficking of a minor and child pornography (LB 519) (Governor Signed into Law on May 31, 2019).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for felony sex trafficking of a minor. (LB 516) (Provisions of LB516 amended into LB 519, May 31, 2019).

Would eliminate the civil SOL against the perpetrator, and extend the civil SOL against others to age 21 plus 12 years, regardless of victim’s age. (LB 249) (Hearing on February 22, 2019).

Nevada

Eliminates the criminal SOL for a sexual assault arising out of the same facts as a murder. As, introduced bill would have extended the criminal SOL to 20 years from the offense for sex trafficking or any crime committed during or in furtherance of a sexual assault or sex trafficking, regardless of victim’s age. Amended bill removed criminal extension for sex trafficking and instead only eliminates criminal SOL for a sexual assault arising out of the same facts as a murder. (SB 9) (Governor Signed into Law on May 16, 2019).

Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony sexual assault where the identity of an accused perpetrator is established by DNA evidence, regardless of victim’s age. (AB 142) (Governor Signed into Law on May 31, 2019).

Would eliminate the civil and criminal SOLs for felony, gross misdemeanor, and misdemeanor sexual abuse of a minor and sexual assault, regardless of victim’s age. Amended bill expands victims’ rights but excludes SOL provisions. (SB 368) (Governor Signed into Law on June 5, 2019).

New Jersey

Extends the civil SOL for child sex abuse to age 55 or 7 years from discovery, whichever is later, for claims against individuals and public and private institutions. Opens a 2-year revival window on December 1, 2019 against perpetrators and institutions. Also, extends the civil SOL for adult sex assault victims to 7 years from the offense or 7 years from discovery, whichever is later. (S477 & A3648) (S477 Governor Signed into Law on May 13, 2019) (A3648 Substituted by S477, March 25, 2019).

Would eliminate the civil SOL. (A4544 & A1162).

Would extend the criminal SOL for sexual contact and endangering the welfare of a child to age of majority (18) plus 10 years, with a 2-year discovery rule. (S1506).

New Mexico

Would extend the criminal SOL for the following felonies committed against minors to age 30: abandonment and abuse, criminal sexual contact, and criminal sexual penetration. Previous version of bill provided for elimination of the criminal SOL, but it was amended to age 30. (SB 55) (Vetoed by Governor, March 16, 2019).

Would extend the civil SOL by adding a 3- year delayed discovery rule. (SB 125) (Senate Postponed Indefinitely, January 17, 2019).

New York

Extends the criminal SOL for felony to age 28 and misdemeanor to age 25. Extends civil SOL to age 55 for claims against people and institutions. Also, removes 90-day notice of claim requirement for claims against public institutions. Opens a 1-year revival window on August 14, 2019 against perpetrators and institutions. (S 2440) (Governor Signed into Law on February 14, 2019).

Eliminates the criminal SOL for 1st degree incest and extends the criminal SOL for rape and criminal sexual act in the 2nd degree to age 43 and in the 3rd degree to age 33. (S 6574) (Governor Signed into Law on September 18, 2019).

Would extend the criminal SOL for remaining sexual offenses that SOL has not already been eliminated for to age of majority (18) plus 15 years for sexual offenses, and extend the civil SOL for childhood sexual abuse or exploitation to 15 years from the offense. (A 2723).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for remaining sexual offenses that SOL has not already been eliminated for and extend the civil SOL to age 50. (S 1328).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for remaining sexual offenses that SOL has not already been eliminated for. (S 952).

Would extend the criminal SOL for felony sex offenses to age 28 and misdemeanor sex offenses to age 25. Would extend the civil SOL for sex offenses to age 23 plus 5 years, and open a 1-year revival window. (A 1175).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for felony sex offenses, expand the categories of defendants criminally liable, extend the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus 6 years, and open a 3- year revival window. (A 3842).

Would open a 1-year revival window for sexual assault of an infant. (A 6935).

Would eliminate the civil SOL for actions based on incest and use of a child in a sexual performance. Would eliminate the criminal SOL for felony sexual offenses, 1st, 2nd and 3rd degree incest, and use of a child in a sexual performance. (A 6507).

North Carolina

Extends the civil SOL for human trafficking, which includes sexual servitude, of a minor to age of majority (18) plus 10 years and of an adult to 10 years from the offense. (SB 200 & HB 198) (HB 198 Governor Signed into Law on July 22, 2019).

Extends the civil SOL to age 28, opens a 2-year revival window, and adds a 2-year extension from criminal conviction for a related felony sexual offense for claims against a perpetrator. Also, extends the criminal SOL for misdemeanor crimes of abuse to 10 years. Prior version would extend the criminal SOL for misdemeanor crimes of abuse to 10 years, extend the civil SOL to age 50 and open a 1-year revival window. Senate amended bill removed civil SOL extension and revival window. House amended bill added civil SOL extension to age 38 and 2-year revival window. (SB 199) (Governor Signed into Law on November 7, 2019).

Would extend the civil SOL to age 38 and open a 2-year revival window. Previous version provided for SOL extension to age 45 and with a 1-year revival window. (HB 37) (Passed in House, June 19, 2019).

Would extend the criminal SOL for misdemeanor crimes of abuse to 10 years, extend the civil SOL to age 50 and open a 1-year revival window. (HB 596).

North Dakota Extends the criminal SOL for felony and misdemeanor sex offenses to 21 years from the offense. (HB 1425) (Governor Signed into Law on March 21, 2019).
Ohio

Would retroactively revive and eliminate the civil SOL for claims against a state university by victims of any age who were sexually abused by a university physician between January 1, 1978 and December 31, 2000. (HB 249) (House Civil Justice Comm. Hearing on September 25, 2019).

Would eliminate the civil SOL for rape against the perpetrator regardless of victim’s age and eliminate the criminal SOL for rape, regardless of victim’s age. (SB 162 & HB 279) (SB 162 Senate Judiciary Comm. Hearing on November 13, 2019).

Oregon Would eliminate the criminal SOL for felony sex offenses, regardless of victim’s age, if a defendant is identified based on DNA analysis. (HB 3073) (Failed in Committee, June 30, 2019).
Pennsylvania

Eliminates the criminal SOL for the following child sex abuse felonies: trafficking, sexual servitude, rape, statutory sexual assault, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, sexual assault, institutional sexual assault, aggravated indecent assault and incest. Extends the criminal SOL for other felony and misdemeanor sexual offenses against minors to age 55. Also, extends the civil SOL to age 55 for victims sexually abused as minors and expands liability for government institutions by providing exceptions to the laws of government immunity and limitations on damages. Amended bill added extension of criminal and civil SOLs for young adult victims sexually abused at ages 18 to 23 by: extending the civil SOL to age 30, extending the criminal SOL to the later of 20 years after the offense or the current criminal SOL running from age 24, and adding a criminal DNA extension of 1 year after identification of perpetrator with DNA evidence. (HB 962) (Governor Signed into Law on November 26, 2019).

A resolution proposing an amendment to the Pennsylvania Constitution to add a 2-year revival window for victims of child sex abuse. (HB 963) (Passed in House and Senate, November 21, 2019).

Would eliminate the civil SOL for sexual abuse of minors and adults and would open a 2-year revival window for all victims, regardless of age at time of offense. Would expand civil liability by providing exceptions to government and sovereign immunity for sexual abuse claims. Would eliminate the criminal SOL for trafficking, sexual servitude, rape, statutory sexual assault, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, sexual assault, institutional sexual assault, aggravated indecent assault and incest. (SB 540) (Senate Hearing on October 2, 2019).

Rhode Island Extends the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus 35 years and expands the 7-year delayed discovery rule to apply not just to the perpetrator but to all defendants. Also applies new SOL retroactively to claims against the perpetrator only. Expands liability for public entities by making new SOL applicable to them. Previous version included a 3-year revival window. (H5171 & S315) (Governor Signed into Law on July 1, 2019). Would eliminate the criminal SOL for 2nd and 3rd degree sexual assault. (H5515) (Comm. recommended measure be held for further study, March 12, 2019).
South Dakota Would open a 2-year revival window. (HB 1269) (Judiciary Comm. Failed 4-6 and deferred to 41st legislative day, February 11, 2019).
Tennessee

Extends the civil SOL to age 33 with a 3-year delayed discovery rule. Eliminates the criminal SOL for child sex abuse felonies and misdemeanors, with a limitation that if prosecuting after victim is age 43, and victim was at or between ages 13 and 17 at the time of the offense, and victim never reported the offense to another person before reaching age 23, admissible and credible evidence corroborating the charge or similar acts by defendant is required. Also eliminates the criminal SOL for rape and aggravated rape of an adult if reported within 3 years of the offense. Previous versions of the bill proposed to eliminate the criminal SOL for child sex abuse felonies and misdemeanors. Would eliminate the criminal SOL for rape and aggravated rape of an adult if reported within 3 years of the offense and to extend the civil SOL to age 48, with a 3-year delayed discovery rule. Amended bills decreased civil SOL from age 48 to age 33. Further amended bill eliminates criminal SOL for rape and aggravated rape, regardless of victim’s age, and rape of a child and aggravated rape of a child, if reported within three years of the offense. Would also eliminate the criminal SOL for child sex abuse felonies and misdemeanors, with a requirement that if prosecuted after victim is age 43, admissible and credible evidence corroborating the charge is required. Further amended bill adopted by House and Senate Conference Committee. (HB 565 & SB 1252) (HB 565 Governor Signed into Law on May 24, 2019) (SB 1252 Substituted by HB 565).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for rape and aggravated rape and rape and aggravated rape of a child. (SB 368, HB 286, SB 592 & HB 112) (SB 368 Passed out of Judiciary Comm. 9-0, February 19, 2019).

Would eliminate the criminal and civil SOL for felony child sexual abuse offenses. (HB 660 & SB 545).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for some sexual offenses when reported to law enforcement within 3 years of offense. (SB 18 & HB 285).

Would extend the criminal SOL to age 43 for some sexual offenses when not reported to law enforcement within 3 years. (SB 18, HB 285, HB 140 & SB 1131).

Would extend the civil SOL by adding a 5-year delayed discovery rule. (SB 954 & HB 1035).

Would eliminate the civil SOL and extend the criminal SOL for felony sex offenses to age of majority (18) plus 25 years. (HB 309 & SB 169) (Withdrawn, February 6, 2019).

Texas Extends the civil SOL to age of majority (18) plus 30 years. Amended bill limits the civil SOL extension to claims against a perpetrator only. Senate Committee amended bill to remove perpetrator only language so that amended SOL applies to claims against non-perpetrators also. (HB 3809) (Governor Signed into Law on June 14, 2019). Would toll the criminal SOL if there is DNA evidence. (SB 735). Would extend the criminal SOL to age of majority (18) plus 20 years for trafficking and sexual performance by a child. (HB 1073) (Hearing on April 29, 2019). Would extend the criminal SOL for abandoning or endangering a child to age of majority (18) plus 10 years. (HB 442) (Passed in House, May 7, 2019).
Utah Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony human trafficking of a child, which includes trafficking for sexual exploitation of the child. (HB 20) (Governor Signed into Law on March 21, 2019). Extends the criminal SOL for felony crimes where the SOL has run as of May 5, 2003 and no charges had been filed, by extending the time from 1 to 4 years that a prosecution must be commenced after a perpetrator has been identified by DNA evidence. (HB 192) (Governor Signed into Law on March 25, 2019). Waives governmental immunity for civil claims of negligence or injury resulting from sexual battery against a student by a school employee, in a position of trust, who is criminally charged, that the school knew or should have known was a sex offender. Also, extends the civil SOL for claims against a governmental entity or its employee to 2 years after a claim arises or discovery of a claim. (HB 311) (Governor Signed into Law on March 25, 2019).
Vermont

Eliminates the civil SOL and revives all expired claims against perpetrators and negligent institutions. Previous version had a 2-year revival window for claims against perpetrators and/or institutions. (HB 330) (Governor Signed into Law on May 28, 2019).

Eliminates the criminal SOL for sexual exploitation of a minor. Previous version also eliminated criminal SOL for lewd and lascivious conduct with a minor. (HB 511) (Governor Signed into Law on May 30, 2019).

Virginia Would extend the criminal SOL for misdemeanors to age of majority (18) plus 5 years. (HB 2525). Would eliminate the civil SOL. (HB 1888). Would extend the criminal SOL for misdemeanors to age of majority (18) plus 20 years. Amended bill would extend the criminal SOL for misdemeanors committed by adults to age of majority (18) plus 5 years. (SB 1484).
Washington Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony rape, sexual misconduct, child molestation, and sexual exploitation of a minor and extends the criminal SOL to 20 years from the offense for rape and indecent liberties, regardless of victim’s age. (SB 5649 & HB 1231) (SB 5649 Governor Signed into Law on April 19, 2019) (HB 1231 Passed in House, March 6, 2019, Senate Hearings on March 28 and April 2, 2019, Passed out of Senate Law and Justice Comm., April 2, 2019). Extends the criminal SOL for felony sex offenses by extending when the SOL begins to run to 2 years from identification of perpetrator by DNA, regardless of victim’s age. (HB 1166) (Governor Signed into Law on April 23, 2019). Would eliminate the criminal SOL for felony sex offenses against minors and rape, regardless of victim’s age. (HB 1234) (Hearing on January 22, 2019).
Washington D.C. Eliminates the criminal SOL for felony sexual abuse, child sexual abuse, sexual abuse of a minor, and incest. Extends the civil SOL where victim was under age 35 to age 40 with a 5-year discovery rule. Also, opens a 2-year revival window. (B22-0021/DC Act 22-593) (Law Effective on May 3, 2019).
Wisconsin Would eliminate the civil SOL and open a 3-year revival window for claims against perpetrators, government and private organizations. (SB 381).
Total Forty (40) States and Washington D.C. Considered SOL Reform in 2019

 

PART II: OVERVIEW OF JURISDICTIONS WITH THE BEST CRIMINAL AND CIVIL SOL LAWS

 D. Jurisdictions with No Criminal SOL

Click here for summary of criminal SOL elimination laws in 43 states, the federal government and D.C.
Alabama None for victims abused when they were under 16
Alaska None for victims abused when they were under 18 (felony charge)
Arizona None for victims abused when they were under 15 or under 18 if the abuser is a parent, guardian, teacher or priest
Arkansas None (as of 2013)
California None for felony sex offenses
Colorado None for felony child sexual offenses
Connecticut None for class A felonies and for any offense involving sexual abuse, sexual exploitation or sexual assault of a minor, including risk of injury involving intimate contact with a victim under age 16.
Delaware None
Florida None for felony sexual battery of minors (defined by Fla. Stat. § 794.011)
Georgia None for (1) trafficking a person for sexual servitude; (2) cruelty to children in the first degree; (3) rape; (4) aggravated sodomy; (5) child molestation or aggravated child molestation; (6) enticing a child for indecent purposes; or (7) incest.
Hawaii None for 1st and 2nd degree sexual assault, and continuous sexual assault of a minor under 14
Idaho Elimination for felony sex abuse and lewd conduct with a child.
Illinois None for felonies and misdemeanors
Indiana None if offense committed with threats or use of deadly force (class A)
Kansas None for rape
Kentucky None for felonies
Louisiana None for prosecutions of crimes for that are punishable by death or life imprisonment, including aggravated rape and forcible rape
Maine None for victim under 16 for felony and misdemeanor incest; unlawful sexual contact; sexual abuse of a minor; rape or gross sexual assault, formerly denominated as gross sexual misconduct.
Maryland None for felonies
Massachusetts None where victim under 16 (after +27 years DNA or other corroborating evidence needed)
Michigan None 1st degree crimes.
Minnesota None for sex trafficking
Mississippi None if (1) victim was abused during ages 14-16 and offender is 3 years older; (2) victim was abused under 14 and offender 2 years older; (3) victim was abused under 18 and abuser is in a position of authority or trust; or (4) involving touching or handling of children for lustful purposes
Missouri Murder, forcible rape, attempted forcible rape, forcible sodomy, attempted forcible sodomy, or any class A felony
Montana None
Nebraska None for felony 1st or 2nd degree sexual assault, or misdemeanor 3rd degree sexual assault when victim was abused under the age of 16, felony incest, sex trafficking of a minor and child pornography.
New Jersey None for sexual assault or aggravated sexual assault
New Mexico None for 1st degree felonies
New York None for 1st degree felonies
North Carolina None
Pennsylvania None for felony trafficking, sexual servitude, rape, statutory sexual assault, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, sexual assault, institutional sexual assault, aggravated indecent assault and incest.
Rhode Island None for 1st degree sexual assault, and 1st and 2nd degree child molestation
South Carolina None
South Dakota None for class A, B, and C felonies; all child rape & forcible rape
Tennessee None for child sex abuse felonies and misdemeanors
Texas None for most sex crimes against young children
Utah None for rape of a child, object rape of a child, sodomy on a child, sexual abuse of a child, aggravated sexual abuse of a child, human trafficking of a child
Vermont None for aggravated sexual assault and sexual exploitation of a minor
Virginia None for felonies
Washington None for felony rape, sexual misconduct, child molestation, and sexual exploitation of a minor
West Virginia None for sexual assault, 1st degree sexual abuse, sexual abuse by parent, guardian, custodian, or person in a position of trust to child
Wisconsin None for 1st degree sexual assault, or repeated class A or B felony offenses against the same child
Wyoming None
Washington D.C. None for felony sexual abuse, child sexual abuse, sexual abuse of a minor, and incest.
Federal Government None
Total Forty-three (43) States, Federal Government and Washington D.C. Eliminated Criminal SOLs

 

E. Jurisdictions with No Civil SOL
(for at least some child sex abuse claims)

click here for summary of civil sol elimination laws in 10 states
Alaska None for felony sex abuse of a minor and felony sexual assault (as of 2001), unlawful exploitation of a minor (as of 2003), and felony sex trafficking or felony human trafficking (as of 2013). Applies to claims arising after the effective dates and to non-expired claims arising before. (Alaska Stat. Ann. § 09.10.065).
Connecticut None if events forming the civil claim led to conviction of first-degree aggravated sexual assault or sexual assault. Applies to any cause of action arising from an incident committed prior to, on or after May 23, 2002. (Conn. Gen. Stat. § 52-577e).
Delaware None for action based on sexual abuse of a minor by an adult. Effective as of July 10, 2007 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (Del. Code Ann. tit. 10, § 8145).
Florida None for sexual battery offenses committed against victims under 16 years old. Effective as of July 1, 2010 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (Fla. Stat. Ann. § 95.11).
Illinois None for action based on childhood sexual abuse. Effective as of January 1, 2014 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (IL ST CH 735 § 5/13-202.2).
Maine None for action based on sexual contact or sexual act with a minor. Effective as of April 7, 2000 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (Me. Rev. Stat. tit. 14, § 752-C).
Minnesota None for action based on sexual abuse of a minor. Effective as of May 25, 2013 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (Minn. Stat. § 541.073 (b)).
Nebraska None for action based on sexual assault of a child against a perpetrator. Effective as of August 24, 2017 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (Neb. Rev. St. § 25-228).
Utah None for action based on intentional or negligent sexual abuse of a minor against a perpetrator. Effective as of March 23, 2015. (Utah Code § 78B-2-308).
Vermont None for action based on childhood sexual abuse. Effective as of July 1, 2019 and it is fully retroactive, applying to all claims arising before or on or after that date. (Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 12, § 522).
Total  Ten (10) States Eliminated Civil SOLs

 

 F. Jurisdictions that Revived Expired Civil SOL
(opened revival window or revived up to a certain age)

click here for summary of civil revival laws in 17 states and D.C.
Arizona (2019-20) 19-month window opened on May 27, 2019 for expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government and will close on December 31, 2020 – open. Also revives SOL up to age 30. (HB 2466 Effective May 27, 2019).
California (2003) 1-year window revived SOL against private organizations only – closed. (Cal. Civ. Proc. Code § 340.1). (2019) 3-year revival window opened on January 1, 2020 for expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – open. Also revives SOL up to age 40. (AB 218 Effective October 13, 2019).
Connecticut (2002) Revives SOL up to age 48 against perpetrators, private organizations and government. (Conn. Gen. Stat. § 52-577d).
Delaware (2007-09) 2-year window revived SOL against perpetrators, private organizations and government – closed. (Del. Code tit. 10, § 8145). (2010-12) Added 2-year window for healthcare providers because original window did not apply to claims against them – closed. (Del. Code tit. 18, § 6856).
Georgia (2015-17) 2-year window revived SOL against perpetrators only – closed. (Ga. Code § 9-3-33.1).
Hawaii (2012-14) 2-year window revived SOL against perpetrators and private organizations. (2014-16) Extended original window for another 2 years and expanded to include claims against the government. (2018-20) Extended window was open until April 24, 2020 – closed. (Haw. Rev. Stat. § 657-1.8).
Massachusetts (2014) Revives SOL up to age 53 against perpetrators only. (Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 260, § 4C).
Michigan (2018) 90-day window revived SOL for victims of Larry Nassar only – closed. (Mich. Comp. Laws § 600.5851b).
Minnesota (2013-16) 3-year window revived SOL against perpetrators and private organizations – closed. (Minn. Stat. § 541.073, 2013 Minn. Sess. Law Serv. Ch. 89 (H.F. 681)).
Montana (2019-20) 1-year window opened on May 7, 2019 for expired claims against perpetrators and entities – closed. (Mont. Code § 27-2-216 Effective May 7, 2019).
New Jersey (2019-21) 2-year window opened on December 1, 2019 for expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – open. Window applies to child sex abuse victims and those sexually assaulted as adults. Also revives SOL up to age 55. (S477 Effective May 13, 2019).
North Carolina (2020-21) 2-year window opened on January 1, 2020 for expired civil claims – open. (S. 199 Effective December 1, 2019).
Oregon (2010) Revives SOL up to age 40 against perpetrators and private organizations. (O.R.S. § 12.117).
Rhode Island (2019) Revives SOL up to age 53 against perpetrator only. (RI ST § 9-1-51 Effective July 1, 2019).
Utah (2016) 3-year window revived SOL against perpetrators only – closed. Also revives SOL up to age 53 against perpetrator only. (Utah Code § 78B-2-308).
Vermont (2019) Permanently revives all expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – open. (H.330 Effective May 28, 2019).
Washington D.C. (2019-21) 2-year window opened on May 3, 2019 for expired claims against perpetrators and entities – open. Window applies to all child sex abuse victims up to age 40 or those who discovered their abuse less than 5 years ago, and in some circumstances, those sexually assaulted as adults. (L22-0311 Effective May 3, 2019).
Total Seventeen States (17) and Washington D.C. Revived Expired Civil SOLs

 

2019 Revival Law Ranking

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