National Overview of Statutes of Limitation (SOLs) for Child Sex Abuse

2022 SOL Reform Legislation and Best Current Civil and Criminal SOLs

PART I: OVERVIEW OF 2022 SOL REFORM BILLS

A. New SOL Reform Laws Going into Effect

B. SOL Reform Bills Passed in Legislature (1 State)

      (1 for civil window/revival)

C. SOL Reform Bills Introduced (19 States & Federal)

(7  to eliminate criminal;  5  to extend criminal; 13  to eliminate civil; 7  to extend civil; and 12  for civil window/revival)

PART II: OVERVIEW OF JURISDICTIONS WITH THE BEST CRIMINAL AND CIVIL SOL LAWS

D. No Criminal SOL (44 States, 5 U.S. Territories, & Federal)

E. No Civil SOL (15 States & 2 U.S. Territories)

F. Revived Expired Civil SOL (24 States & 3 U.S. Territories)

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Last updated: January 19, 2022

At a Glance:

 

 

 

 

PART I: OVERVIEW OF 2022 SOL REFORM BILLS

A. New SOL Reform Laws Going into Effect

click here for summary of new sol reform laws

 

 

B. SOL Reform Bills Passed in Legislature

click here for summary of sol reform bills that passed in the legislature in 1 State

 

New YorkWould open a 2-year revival window in New York City for gender-motivated violence, including sexual assault of children and adults.  (Int 2372-2021) (Passed in NYC Counsel, Dec. 9, 2021, awaiting Mayor approval).
TotalOne (1) State Passed SOL Reform

 

C. SOL Reform Bills Introduced in Legislature

click here for summary of sol reform bills in 19 states and the federal government that were introduced in legislature
California

Would add a civil cause of action for online sex trafficking and exploitation of minors and adults against individuals and entities, including online services and websites, with an SOL of age 28 (age of majority, plus 10 years) or 6 years from discovery. Also, provides for statutory damages after notice of $200,000 for failing to remove the material within two business days. (SB 435) (Passed out of S. Judiciary Comm., Jan. 12, 2022; S. Appropriations Comm. Hearing, Jan. 18, 2022).

Florida

Would eliminate the civil SOL for sexual offenses against minors and adults. (HB 655).

Georgia

Would extend the civil SOL from age 23 to age 38 and the delayed discovery rule from 2 to 4 years. Would open a 1-year revival window against perpetrators and entities, with a limitation that claims against entities can only be brought for conduct occurring after 1988.  Previous versions of bill would extend civil SOL to age 52 and limited claims against entities under the window to conduct occurring after 1973. (HB 109) (Passed in House, March 8, 2021).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for rape, aggravated sodomy, and aggravated sexual battery of minors and adults. (SB 18) (S. Judiciary Comm. Hearing, February 10, 2021).

 

Iowa

Would eliminate criminal and civil SOLs for the following felonies: sexual abuse in the first, second, and third degree, sexual abuse or exploitation by a counselor, therapist or school employee, kidnapping, sex trafficking, and incest, and would open a 3-year revival window for expired claims related to these felonies. (SF 572) (SF 572 Passed out of S. Judiciary Comm., March 8, 2021).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for felony sexual abuse of a minor in the first second, or third degree, incest, and sexual exploitation. (SF 33 & HF 566).

Would eliminate the civil SOL for sexual abuse and offenses against minors and open a 3-year revival window for expired claims of sexual abuse of a minor by a counselor, therapist, or school employee.  (SF 32).

Would extend the criminal SOL for sexual offenses against minors and sex trafficking from age 28 to age 33. (SF 76 & HF 449).

Would extend the criminal SOL for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd degree felony sexual abuse of minors from age 33 to age 48. Would also add a new provision for sexually motivated felony and misdemeanor offenses against minors – including sexual exploitation, indecent exposure and obscene materials – and set the SOL at age 48. (HF 225) (Passed out of H. Judiciary Subcomm., February 18, 2021).

KansasWould eliminate the civil SOL and open a permanent revival window for claims that were not expired prior to 1992. (SB 271).
Massachusetts

Would eliminate the civil SOL for child sex abuse and open a permanent revival window for all expired claims. Would also remove the $20,000 cap on damages for claims against charitable organizations. (S 1088) (Joint Judiciary Comm. Hearing on December 7, 2021).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for indecent assault and battery and rape of a minor. Would also extend the civil SOL for civil rights violations for sexual assault and abuse from age 21 to age 53. (H 1617) (Joint Judiciary Comm. Hearing on December 7, 2021).

Would revive expired civil claims against non-perpetrators up until a victim reaches age 53 if the perpetrator of the abuse is deceased. (S 1007) (Joint Judiciary Comm. Hearing on December 7, 2021).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for indecent assault and battery or rape of a minor. (S 1087) (Joint Judiciary Comm. Hearing on December 7, 2021).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for all sex offenses against minors and adults if there is DNA evidence identifying the perpetrator. (S 1096) (Joint Judiciary Comm. Hearing on December 7, 2021).

Would extend the criminal SOL for felony incest to age 24 (age of majority, 18, plus 6 years) or 6 years from reporting, whichever is earlier. (H 1722) (Joint Judiciary Comm. Hearing on December 7, 2021).

Would extend the civil SOL for sex trafficking of minors to 10 years after the trafficking victim is freed or age 28 (age of majority, 18, plus 10 years). (S 1094) (Joint Judiciary Comm. Hearing on September 15, 2021).

Michigan

Would extend the civil SOL for minor and adult victims to the later of age 28, 10 years from the abuse, or 6 years from discovery. Also, would open a 1-year revival window for physician sex abuse of minors and adults and remove the 1-year notice of claim requirement for suits against the government. (HB 4306) (H. Oversight Comm. Hearing, Sept. 30, 2021).

Would extend the criminal SOL for first degree criminal sexual conduct and trafficking punishable by life in prison by occurring before May 2, 2001, by allowing prosecution if it was reported within a year of the offense but the perpetrator’s legal name was unknown. (HB 4493).

MississippiWould eliminate the civil SOL for CSA, exploitation and trafficking of minors and persons under the disability of unsoundness of mind. (HB 138 & HB 246).
MissouriWould  eliminate the criminal SOL for the following felonies: 1st degree sexual abuse, 1st degree attempted sexual abuse, 2nd degree sexual abuse, 2nd degree attempted sexual abuse, incest and attempted incest. (SB 837).
NebraskaWould eliminate the civil SOL for claims against non-perpetrators for sexual assault of a child. (LB 833) (Judiciary Comm. Hearing, Jan. 21, 2022).
New Jersey

Would eliminate the civil SOL for the following claims: sexual assault, endangering child welfare by engaging in sexual conduct that would impair or debauch the morals of the child, and recording a child in sexual acts. Would also eliminate civil SOL for any action filed against individual or entity which produces, distributes, or otherwise engages in the child pornography industry. (AB 427).

New York

Would open a 2-year window in New York City for gender-motivated violence, including sexual assault of children and adults.  (Int 2372-2021) (Passed in NYC Counsel, Dec. 9, 2021, awaiting Mayor approval).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for all sex offenses against minors and for hindering the prosecution of sex offenses against minors, incest and use of a child in a sexual performance. Would add criminal liability for endangering welfare of a child in the 1st degree, concealing or hindering discovery of child sex abuse or evidence, and broaden criminal liability for non-profits for child sex abuse. Would also open a 3-year revival window for all expired claims, including those governed by an SOL of another jurisdiction, with a provision barring confidential settlements. Would extend the civil SOL where a child sex abuse victim has died from 3 years after death with an upper limit of age 21, to 6 years after death, but no later than age 24. (A 3210).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for the following child sex abuse crimes: felony 1st and 2nd degree rape, 2nd and 3rd degree criminal sexual act, 1st degree sexual abuse, and 2nd, 3rd, and 4th degree aggravated sexual abuse, and misdemeanor 2nd degree sexual abuse. Amended bill would also eliminate the civil SOL for child sex abuse offenses and open a permanent revival window for expired claims. (A 618).

Would broaden crime of rape to include oral and anal sexual contact, eliminating the criminal SOL for first degree contact and extending the criminal SOL to age 43 for second degree contact. (S 1075 & A 6319) (A 6319 Passed in Assembly, April 27, 2021).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for the following felonies: 1st, 2nd , and 3rd degree incest and use of a child in a sexual performance.  Would also eliminate the civil SOL for all sexual offenses against minors. (A 4725).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for the following felonies: 1st, 2nd, and 3rd degree incest, use of a child in a sexual performance, and predatory sexual assault. (A 5754).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for the following child sex abuse crimes: felony 2nd and 3rd degree rape, and 2nd and 3rd degree criminal sexual act. (A 814).

Ohio

Would eliminate the civil SOL for rape of minors and adults, extend the civil SOL from age 30 to age 55 for other child sex abuse offenses, and open a 3-year revival window for expired claims. Would also eliminate the criminal SOL for rape and conspiracy, attempt or complicity to commit rape of minors and adults. (HB 266).

Would eliminate the criminal and civil SOL for rape and conspiracy, attempt or complicity to commit rape of minors and adults. (SB 198).

Oklahoma

Would eliminate  the civil SOL for child sex abuse or exploitation against perpetrators and other individuals and extend the civil SOL against institutions to the later of age 48 or 5 years from discovery of the abuse. Would also open a 5-year revival window for all expired claims. (HB 1002) (Passed in House, March 11, 2021).

Would extend the criminal SOL for sex trafficking of minors and adults from 3-years after the offense to 3-years after reporting to law enforcement (SB 974). 

Pennsylvania

Would open a 2-year revival window for expired claims of sexual abuse of minors. Would also retroactively remove sovereign and government immunity for civil child sex abuse claims. (HB 951) (Passed in House, April 7, 2021; Passed out of S. Judiciary Comm., April 21, 2021).

A resolution to amend the Pennsylvania Constitution to add a 2-year revival window for victims of child sex abuse. (SB 8) (Passed out of S. Judiciary Comm., January 25, 2021 and S. Appropriations Comm., January 26th, 2021, S. Rules and Executive Nominations Comm. Hearing, March 22, 2021).

A resolution to amend the Pennsylvania Constitution with an emergency amendment that adds a 2-year revival window for victims of child sex abuse. (HB 881) (House Vote Against Bill, March 17, 2021).

Would eliminate the civil SOL for sexual abuse of minors and adults and open a 2-year revival window for expired claims of sexual abuse of minors and adults. Would make a settlement agreement provisions that bars disclosure of a claim of sexual abuse void, unless the victim requests it. Would also eliminate the criminal SOL for sexual assault of adults. (SB 406).

Would open a 2-year revival window for expired claims of sexual abuse of minors and adults. (SB 407).

South CarolinaWould extend the civil SOL to age 55 or 5 years from discovery, and make it applicable to all types of defendants. (SB 75).
UtahA joint resolution to amend the Utah Constitution to give the Legislature power to revive expired child sexual abuse claims. (H.J.R. 4).
VirginiaWould eliminate the civil SOL for sexual abuse of a minor and open a permanent revival window for expired claims against perpetrators and other individuals. (SB 483).
WisconsinWould eliminate the criminal SOL for prosecuting lesser included child sex abuse offenses where the perpetrator has been convicted of 1st degree sexual assault of a child. (SB 382 & AB 386) (AB 386 H. Judiciary Comm. Hearing, Oct. 27, 2021) (SB 382 S. Judiciary and Public Safety Comm. Hearing, Jan. 13, 2022).
Federal Government

Would incentivize states to eliminate criminal and civil SOLs for child sex abuse and revive time-barred civil claims. (HR 4860, Statutes of Limitation for Child Sexual Abuse Reform Act).

Would incentivize states to eliminate criminal and civil SOLs for child sex abuse. (HR 5049 & S 3107, No Time Limit for Justice Act).

Would eliminate the civil SOL for offenses against minors, including child sex abuse, sex trafficking, exploitation, and CSAM. (S 3013 Eliminating Limits to Justice for Child Sex Abuse Victims Act of 2021).

TotalNinteen (19) States & Federal Government Considering SOL Reform in 2022

 

PART II: OVERVIEW OF JURISDICTIONS WITH THE BEST CRIMINAL AND CIVIL SOL LAWS

Best SOLs

 D. Jurisdictions with No Criminal SOL

click here for summary of criminal sol elimination laws in 44 states, federal government and d.c.
AlabamaNone for victims abused when they were under 16
AlaskaNone for victims abused when they were under 18 (felony charge)
ArizonaNone for victims abused when they were under 15 or under 18 if the abuser is a parent, guardian, teacher or priest or for child sex trafficking
ArkansasNone (as of 2013)
CaliforniaNone for felony sex offenses
ColoradoNone for felony child sexual offenses
ConnecticutNone for class A felonies and for any offense involving sexual abuse, sexual exploitation or sexual assault of a minor, including risk of injury involving intimate contact with a victim under age 16.
DelawareNone
FloridaNone for felony sexual battery of minors (defined by Fla. Stat. § 794.011)
Georgia None for (1) trafficking a person for sexual servitude; (2) cruelty to children in the first degree; (3) rape; (4) aggravated sodomy; (5) child molestation or aggravated child molestation; (6) enticing a child for indecent purposes; or (7) incest.
HawaiiNone for 1st and 2nd degree sexual assault, and continuous sexual assault of a minor under 14
IdahoElimination for felony sex abuse and lewd conduct with a child.
IllinoisNone for felonies and misdemeanors
IndianaNone if offense committed with threats or use of deadly force (class A)
IowaNone for all child sex abuse felonies and misdemeanors.
KansasNone for rape
KentuckyNone for felonies
LouisianaNone for prosecutions of crimes for that are punishable by death or life imprisonment, including aggravated rape and forcible rape
MaineNone for victim under 16 for felony and misdemeanor incest; unlawful sexual contact; sexual abuse of a minor; rape or gross sexual assault, formerly denominated as gross sexual misconduct.
MarylandNone for felonies
MassachusettsNone where victim under 16 (after +27 years DNA or other corroborating evidence needed)
MichiganNone 1st degree crimes.
MinnesotaNone for the following felonies: solicitation, inducement, and promotion of prostitution, sex trafficking, and criminal sexual conduct in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th degrees.
MississippiNone if (1) victim was abused during ages 14-16 and offender is 3 years older; (2) victim was abused under 14 and offender 2 years older; (3) victim was abused under 18 and abuser is in a position of authority or trust; or (4) involving touching or handling of children for lustful purposes
MissouriMurder, forcible rape, attempted forcible rape, forcible sodomy, attempted forcible sodomy, or any class A felony
MontanaNone
NebraskaNone for felony 1st or 2nd degree sexual assault, or misdemeanor 3rd degree sexual assault when victim was abused under the age of 16, felony incest, sex trafficking of a minor and child pornography.
New JerseyNone for sexual assault or aggravated sexual assault
New MexicoNone for 1st degree felonies
New YorkNone for 1st degree felonies
North CarolinaNone
PennsylvaniaNone for felony trafficking, sexual servitude, rape, statutory sexual assault, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, sexual assault, institutional sexual assault, aggravated indecent assault and incest.
Rhode IslandNone for 1st degree sexual assault, and 1st and 2nd degree child molestation
South CarolinaNone
South DakotaNone for class A, B, and C felonies; all child rape & forcible rape
TennesseeNone for child sex abuse felonies and misdemeanors
TexasNone for most sex crimes against young children
UtahNone for rape of a child, object rape of a child, sodomy on a child, sexual abuse of a child, aggravated sexual abuse of a child, human trafficking of a child
VermontNone for aggravated sexual assault and sexual exploitation of a minor
VirginiaNone for felonies
WashingtonNone for felony rape, sexual misconduct, child molestation, and sexual exploitation of a minor
West VirginiaNone for sexual assault, 1st degree sexual abuse, sexual abuse by parent, guardian, custodian, or person in a position of trust to child
WisconsinNone for 1st degree sexual assault, or repeated class A or B felony offenses against the same child
WyomingNone
Washington D.C.None for felony sexual abuse, child sexual abuse, sexual abuse of a minor, and incest.
Federal GovernmentNone
TotalForty-four (44) States, Federal Government and Washington D.C. Eliminated Criminal SOLs

 

E. Jurisdictions with No Civil SOL
(for at least some child sex abuse claims)

click here for summary of civil sol elimination laws in 15 states and 2 Territories
AlaskaNone for felony sex abuse of a minor and felony sexual assault (as of 2001), unlawful exploitation of a minor (as of 2003), and felony sex trafficking or felony human trafficking (as of 2013). Applies to claims against perpetrators arising after the effective dates and to non-expired claims arising before. (Alaska Stat. Ann. § 09.10.065).
ArizonaNone for action based on sex trafficking of minors and adults (as of 2021).  (AZ ST § 12-721).
ColoradoNone for sexual assault of minors and adults.  Applies to claims against all defendants arising after the effective date and to non-expired claims arising before (as of 2021). (SB21-073, 73rd General Assembly, 1st Reg. Sess. (2021)). Also, none for new cause of action for sexual misconduct with minors. Applies to claims against perpetrators, private institutions, and government for abuse in 2022 or later (as of 2022). (SB21-088, 73rd General Assembly, 1st Reg. Sess. (2021)).
ConnecticutNone if events forming the civil claim led to conviction of first-degree aggravated sexual assault or sexual assault. Applies to any cause of action arising from an incident committed prior to, on or after May 23, 2002. (Conn. Gen. Stat. § 52-577e).
DelawareNone for action based on sexual abuse of a minor by an adult. Effective as of July 10, 2007 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (Del. Code tit. 10, § 8145).
FloridaNone for sexual battery offenses committed against victims under 16 years old. Effective as of July 1, 2010 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (Fla. Stat. Ann. § 95.11).
GuamNone for action based on child sexual abuse. Effective as of September 23, 2016 and it is fully retroactive, applying to call claims arising before on or after that date. (GU ST T. 7, § 11301.1).
IllinoisNone for action based on childhood sexual abuse. Effective as of January 1, 2014 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (IL ST CH 735 § 5/13-202.2).
LouisianaNone for actions based on sexual abuse of a minor. Effective June 14, 2021 and applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (2021 La. Sess. Law Serv. Act 322 (H.B. 492)).
MaineNone for action based on sexual contact or sexual act with a minor. Effective as of April 7, 2000 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (ME ST T. 14 § 752-C).
MinnesotaNone for action based on sexual abuse of a minor. Effective as of May 25, 2013 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (Minn. Stat. § 541.073(b)).
NebraskaNone for action based on sexual assault of a child against a perpetrator. Effective as of August 24, 2017 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (Neb. Rev. St. § 25-228).
NevadaNone for action based on child sex abuse against a perpetrator where there is clear and convincing evidence of the abuse. (Petersen v. Bruen, 106 Nev. 271, 281 (1990)). None for claims against a perpetrator or someone criminally liable for sexual abuse or exploitation of a minor (including trafficking, prostitution, and pornography) and a promoter, possessor, or viewer of CSAM (child sexual abuse material). Effective as of June 2, 2021, and it is fully retroactive, applying to all claims arising before on or after that date. (2021 Nevada Laws Ch. 288 (S.B. 203)).
New HampshireNone for action based on sexual assault or related offenses against minors and adults. Effective as of September 18, 2020. (NH ST § 508:4-g).
Northern Mariana IslandsNone for action based on child sexual abuse. Effective as of November 10, 2021, and it is fully retroactive, applying to call claims arising before on or after that date.  (2021 N.M.I. Pub. L. No. 22-12 (HB 22-2, SDI)).
UtahNone for action based on intentional or negligent sexual abuse of a minor against a perpetrator. Effective as of March 23, 2015. (Utah Code § 78B-2-308).
VermontNone for action based on childhood sexual abuse. Effective as of July 1, 2019 and it is fully retroactive, applying to all claims arising before or on or after that date. (VT. STAT. ANN TIT. 12, § 522).
Total Fifteen (15) States and Two (2) Territories Eliminated Civil SOLs

 

2020 Civil Age Cap Ranking

 F. Jurisdictions that Revived Expired Civil SOL
(opened revival window or revived up to a certain age)

click here for summary of civil revival laws in 24 states and 3 Territories
Arizona(2019-20) 19-month window opened on May 27, 2019 for expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government and closed on December 31, 2020 – closed. Also revived SOL up to age 30. (AZ ST § 12-514; H.B. 2466, 54th Leg., 1st Reg. Sess. (Ariz. 2019)).
Arkansas(2022-23) 2-year window opens February 1, 2022 for expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – open. (ARK. CODE ANN. § 16-118-118).
California

(2003-04) 1-year window revived SOL against private organizations only – closed. (Cal. Civ. Proc. Code § 340.1).

(2020-22) 3-year revival window opened on January 1, 2020 for expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – open. Also revives SOL up to age 40. (Cal. Civ. Proc. Code § 340.1).

Colorado*(2022-25) 3-year window opened on January 1, 2022 for claims of abuse occurring from 1960-2021 against perpetrators, private organizations and government, subject to damages caps – open.  Colorado’s new cause of action is not a revival law, but it is included in this section because it opens a window to justice for many survivors whose common law claims have expired. (SB21-088, 73rd General Assembly, 1st Reg. Sess. (2021)).
Connecticut(2002) Revives SOL up to age 48 against perpetrators, private organizations and government. (Conn. Gen. Stat. § 52-577d).
Delaware

(2007-09) 2-year window revived SOL against perpetrators, private organizations and government – closed. (Del. Code tit. 10, § 8145).

(2010-12) Added 2-year window for healthcare providers because original window did not apply to claims against them – closed. (Del. Code tit. 18, § 6856).

Georgia(2015-17) 2-year window revived SOL against perpetrators only – closed. (Ga. Code § 9-3-33.1).
Guam

(2011) 2-year window revived SOL against their abusers – closed. (7 G.C.A. § 11306(2)).

(2016) Permanently revives all expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – open. (tit. 7 G.C.A. § 11301.1(b)).

Hawaii

(2012-14) 2-year window revived SOL against perpetrators and private organizations – closed. (Haw. Rev. Stat. § 657-1.8).

(2014-16) Extended original window for another 2 years and expanded to include claims against the government – closed. (Haw. Rev. Stat. § 657-1.8).

(2018-20) Extended window was open until April 24, 2020 – closed. (Haw. Rev. Stat. § 657-1.8).

Kentucky(2021) Revives SOL up to 5 years after the date the SOL expired. (2021 Kentucky Laws Ch. 89 (HB 472)).
Louisiana(2021) 3-year window revives SOL against any party – open. (2021 La. Sess. Law Serv. Act 322 (H.B. 492)).
Maine(2021) Permanently revives all expired claims against any party – open. (ME ST T. 14 § 752-C).
Massachusetts(2014) Revives SOL up to age 53 against perpetrators only. (Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 260, § 4C; 2014 Mass. Legis. Serv. Ch. 145 (H.B. 4126)).
Michigan(2018) 90-day window revived SOL for victims of Larry Nassar only – closed. (Mich. Comp. Laws § 600.5851b).
Minnesota(2013-16) 3-year window revived SOL against perpetrators and private organizations – closed. (Minn. Stat. § 541.073, 2013 Minn. Sess. Law Serv. Ch. 89 (H.F. 681)).
Montana(2019-20) 1-year window opened on May 7, 2019 for expired claims against perpetrators and entities – closed. Also revives SOL up to age 27. (Mont. Code § 27-2-216).
Nevada(2021) Permanently revives all expired claims against perpetrators or persons criminally liable for sexual abuse or exploitation of a minor (including trafficking, prostitution, and pornography) and promoters, possessors, or viewers of CSAM (child sexual abuse material) – open. Also, revives SOL up to age 38 for sexual abuse or exploitation of a minor against other defendants, with treble damages recoverable for participating in or covering up the abuse. (2021 Nevada Laws Ch. 288 (S.B. 203)).
New Jersey(2019-21) 2-year window opened on December 1, 2019 for expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – closed. Window applies to child sex abuse victims and those sexually assaulted as adults. Also revives SOL up to age 55. (2019 NJ Sess. Law Serv. Ch. 120 (SENATE 477)).
New York

(2019-20) 1-year window opened on August 14, 2019 for expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – closed. (2019 Sess. Law News of N.Y. Ch. 11 (S. 2440)).

(2020-21) Extended window via executive order (Executive Order No. 202.29) and then again with a 1-year window extension law keeping window open until August 14, 2021. (N.Y. C.P.L.R. 214-g; S.B. 7082, 2020 Leg., Reg. Sess. (N.Y. 2020)).

North Carolina(2020-21) 2-year window opened on January 1, 2020 for expired civil claims – closed. (2019 North Carolina Laws S.L. 2019-245 (S.B. 199)).
Northern Mariana Islands(2021) Permanently revives all expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – open. (2021 N.M.I. Pub. L. No. 22-12 (HB 22-2, SDI)).
Oregon(2010) Revives SOL up to age 40 against perpetrators and private organizations. (O.R.S. § 12.117).
Rhode Island(2019) Revives SOL up to age 53 against perpetrator only. (RI ST § 9-1-51).
Utah*(2016) Permanently revived SOL up to age 53 against perpetrators or persons criminally liable and 3-year window opened on May 10, 2016 for expired claims against perpetrators and persons criminally liable. The revival law is not in effect because it was held unconstitutional in 2020. (Utah Code Ann. § 78B-2-308).
Vermont(2019) Permanently revives all expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – open. (VT. STAT. ANN TIT. 12, § 522).
West Virginia(2020) Revives SOL up to age 36 against perpetrators and private organizations. (W.V. Code §55-2-15).
Washington D.C.(2019-21) 2-year window opened on May 3, 2019 for expired claims against perpetrators and entities – closed. Window applies to all child sex abuse victims up to age 40 or those who discovered their abuse less than 5 years ago, and in some circumstances, those sexually assaulted as adults. (D.C. Code § 12-301).
TotalTwenty-Four (24) States and Three (3) Territories Revived Expired Civil SOLs

 

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