2024 SOL TRACKER

National Overview of Statutes of Limitation (SOLs) for Child Sex Abuse

2024 SOL Reform Legislation and Best Current Civil and Criminal SOLs

PART I: OVERVIEW OF 2024 SOL REFORM BILLS

A. New SOL Reform Laws Going into Effect (0 States)

B. SOL Reform Bills Passed in Legislature and Awaiting Approval (0 States) 

C. SOL Reform Bills Introduced (31 States & Federal)

     (16 to eliminate criminal; 8 to extend criminal; 19 to eliminate civil; 19 to extend civil; 19 for civil window/revival)

PART II: OVERVIEW OF JURISDICTIONS WITH THE BEST CRIMINAL AND CIVIL SOL LAWS

D. No Criminal SOL (44 States, 5 U.S. Territories, & Federal)

E. No Civil SOL (18 States, 2 U.S. Territories, & Federal)

F. Revived Expired Civil SOL (27 States & 3 U.S. Territories)

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Last updated: February 27, 2024

At a Glance:

 

 

PART I: OVERVIEW OF 2024 SOL REFORM BILLS

A. New SOL Reform Laws Going into Effect

click here for summary of new sol reform laws

 

Total No States with New SOL Reform Laws in 2024

 

B. SOL Reform Bills Passed in Legislature

click here for summary of sol reform bills that passed in legislature and are awaiting approval

 

 

 

Total No State Legislature Passed SOL Reform that is Awaiting Approval in 2024

 

C. SOL Reform Bills Introduced in Legislature

click here for summary of sol reform bills in 31 states and the federal government that were introduced in legislature

 

Alabama

Would extend and revive the civil SOL for all sex offenses against a person under 19 years of age up to age 55 (age 19, plus 36 years) and open a 2-year revival window for all expired claims, including for those age 55 and older. (SB 19).

Would eliminate the civil SOL and revive childhood sexual abuse claims against a bankruptcy estate, i.e. the Boy Scouts of America. (SB 18 & SB 93) (SB 18 S. Judiciary Comm. Hearing, Feb. 21, 2024).

Alaska Would eliminate the criminal SOL for first and second degree sex trafficking and extend the SOL for third degree sex trafficking to 10 years from the offense. (SB 66).
Arizona Would shorten the criminal SOL for some CSA felonies and misdemeanors by changing the SOL to run from when the state discovers the offense, to the date of the offense. (HB 2043).
California Would open a 1-year revival window for child sexual claims arising from sexual assault by employees of juvenile probation camp or detention facilities owned and operated by the Division of Juvenile Justice. (AB 1547) (Passed out of Assembly Judiciary Comm., April 18, 2023; A. Appropriations Comm. Hearing, May 18, 2023; Failed, Feb. 1, 2024See CHILD USA 4/10/23 Testimony.
Colorado

Resolution to amend the Colorado Constitution to permit a retrospective law that would open a revival window for child sexual abuse claims and waive governmental immunity. (SCR 001) (Passed out of S. Judiciary Comm., Feb. 7, 2024)See CHILD USA 2/5/24 Testimony.

Would add a new civil cause of action for a youth sports organization failing to conduct criminal background checks and set the SOL at age 20. (HB 1080) (H. Health and Human Services Comm. Hearing, Feb. 20, 2024).

Would add a new civil cause of action for non profit organizations against human traffickers and set the SOL at 6 years from the offense or 3 years from discovery. (HB 1261) (H. State, Civic, Military & VA Committee Hearing, Mar. 7, 2024).

Florida Would amend Florida’s sovereign immunity law by extending the time for notice of claims against the State to filed from 3 years after the claim accrues to age 31 (age of majority, 18, plus 13 years) for sexual battery of a child under age 16. Would shorten the notice time to 18 months for all other claims. Would also increase damage caps for claims against the State to $400,000 for a single judgment or $600 for multiple judgments arising from a single occurrence. (HB 569 & SB 472) (HB 569 Passed out of H. Civil Justice Subcomm., Jan. 11, 2024; Passed out of H. Appropriations Comm., Jan. 31, 2024; S. Judiciary Comm. Hearing, Feb. 14, 2024) (SB 472 Passed out of S. Gov’t Oversight & Accountability Comm., Jan. 29, 2024; S. Appropriations Comm. Hearings, Feb. 22 & 26, 2024). See CHILD USA 1/29/24 SB 472 Testimony.
Hawaii

Would extend the civil SOL for CSA committed on or after July 1, 2024 from age 26 to age 50 (age of majority, 18, plus 32 years) and from 3 to 5 years after reasonable discovery, whichever occurs later. Prior version would have extended also for CSA before July 1, 2024 if claim was not already expired. (HB 1968) (Passed out of H. Judiciary & Hawaiian Affairs Comm., Feb. 1, 2024).

Would extend the civil SOL for CSA claims from age 26 to age 50 (age of majority, 18, plus 32 years) and from 3 to 5 years after reasonable discovery, whichever occurs later. (SB 2601) (Passed out of S. Judiciary Comm., Feb. 16, 2024).

Would eliminate the civil SOL for sex trafficking and broaden the cause of action to apply to claims against and individuals and a business, owner, or operator of a transient accommodation, or other commercial entity. (SB 2758) (Passed out of S. Judiciary Comm., Feb. 13, 2024).

Idaho Would eliminate the criminal SOL for incest. (SB 1346) (Passed out of S. Judiciary Comm., Feb. 20, 2024).
Illinois

Would eliminate the civil SOL and revive childhood sexual abuse claims against a bankruptcy estate, i.e. the Boy Scouts of America. (SB 153).

Would broaden the definition of grooming exploitation of a child and extend the criminal SOL for grooming a child under 17 years old to age 27. (HB 2458 & SB 1576) (HB 2458 H. Judiciary Comm. Hearing, Mar. 7 & 9, 2023).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for trafficking of minors. (HB 5467).

Indiana

Would eliminate the civil SOL and revive childhood sexual abuse claims against an entity initiating bankruptcy protection on February 18 2020, i.e. the Boy Scouts of America. (HB 1047) (Passed out of H. Courts and Criminal Code Comm., January 11, 2024; S. Corrections Comm. Hearing, Feb. 20, 2024). See CHILD USA 2/18/24 Testimony.

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for Level 3 felony rape and child molesting and revive time-barred prosecutions for CSA felonies for 5 years after discovery of DNA, recording, or confession evidence . (SB 151) (Passed out of S. Corrections and Crim Law Comm., Jan. 30, 2024; Passed in Senate, Feb. 5, 2024).

Iowa

Would eliminate the civil SOL and open a permanent revival window for CSA, trafficking, and CSAM claims against all defendants and remove the 2-year SOL and notice of claim requirements for claims against the state. (SF 2233) (S. Judiciary Comm. Hearing, Feb. 13, 2024).

Would eliminate the civil SOL for child sexual abuse and open a 3-year revival window for expired claims related to these felonies against all types of defendants.  (SF 158).

Would add a new civil cause of action with no SOL against social media platforms for knowingly facilitating commercial sexual exploitation of a minor and set statutory damages at $1 million to $4 million for each violation. (SF 2219).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for continuous sexual abuse of a child, and kidnapping and burglary of a child in the course of sexual abuse. (SF 233 & SF 525) (SF 525 Passed in Senate, Mar. 22, 2023; Passed out of H. Judiciary Subcomm., Mar. 27, 2023).

Would eliminate the civil SOL for certain sexual offenses against minors if a perpetrator is convicted of the offense. (SSB 1194 & SF 524) (Passed out of S. Judiciary Comm., March 6, 2023 and replaced by SF 524).

Would eliminate the civil SOL for CSA by a counselor, therapist, school employee or adult providing training instruction, extend the civil SOL for CSA to 4 years from discovery,  and open a 3-year revival window for expired CSA claims. (SF 259).

Kansas

Would eliminate the criminal and civil SOL for CSA felonies and open a permanent revival window for all claims for abuse occurring on or after July 1, 1984. (HB 2169 & SB 95).

Would eliminate civil SOL for CSA and revive claims against any party for damages that occurred on or after July 1, 1984. (HB 2550 & SB 364).

Kentucky

Would eliminate the civil SOL for CSA, trafficking, and CSAM. (HB 223 & HB 278) (HB 278 Comm. Substitute Passed out of H. Judiciary Comm. Feb. 6, 2024).

Would broaden the felony of promoting trafficking, which has no SOL, to include advertising, patronizing, maintaining, or soliciting a person knowing they will be subject to trafficking. (HB 3).

Maryland Would eliminate the criminal SOL for misdemeanor sexual extortion, stalking, and revenge porn. (SB 391 & HB 544) (SB 391 S. Judiciary Comm. Hearing, Feb. 2, 2024) (HB 544 H. Judiciary Comm. Hearing, Feb. 13, 2024).
Massachusetts

Would eliminate the civil SOL for child sex abuse and open a permanent revival window for all expired claims against all types of defendants. (S 1038 & H 1614) (Joint Judiciary Comm. Hearing, Sept. 12, 2023).

Would extend the civil SOL for child and adult sexual abuse claims under Title IX to age 53. (H 1537) (Joint Judiciary Comm. Hearing, Sept. 12, 2o23).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for rape of a child and indecent assault and battery of a child. (S 1176).

Would extend the civil SOL for trafficking to age 28. (S 1062) (Joint Judiciary Comm. Hearing, May 16, 2023).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for rape and indecent assault and battery of a minor. (H 1536).

Would extend the criminal SOL for incest to age 28. (H 1613) (Joint Judiciary Comm. Hearing, Sept. 12, 2023).

Would extend the criminal SOL for sex trafficking to age 28. (S 1027) (Joint Judiciary Comm. Hearing, May 16, 2023).

Would remove the $20k damage cap for CSA claims against charitable institutions. (H 1446).

Michigan

Would extend the civil SOL for criminal sexual conduct committed against minors and adults to age 52, 10 years from accrual, or 7 years after discovery, and open a 2-year revival window for all expired claims. Also, if the perpetrator is convicted the SOL is eliminated. (HB 4482) (Passed out of H. Criminal Justice Comm., October 31, 2023). See CHILD USA 10/31 Testimony.

Would remove the 1-year notice of claim requirement for minor victims of criminal sexual conduct claims against the State. (HB 4487) (Passed out of H. Criminal Justice Comm., October 31, 2023). See CHILD USA 10/31 Testimony.

Would remove the 3-year SOL for minor victims of criminal sexual conduct claims against the State. Prior version was applicable to criminal sexual conduct committed against minors and adults. (HB 4484) (Passed out of H. Criminal Justice Comm., October 31, 2023). See CHILD USA 10/31 Testimony.

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for second and third degree criminal sexual conduct offenses against minors and adults committed on or after the effective date. Prior version would have been applicable to crimes committed before the effective date if the SOL was not already expired. (HB 4485) (Passed out of H. Criminal Justice Comm., October 31, 2023). See CHILD USA 10/31 Testimony.

Would remove sovereign immunity for criminal sexual conduct claims against a public university, college, or school district, or their employees or agents. Prior version would have removed sovereign immunity for criminal sexual conduct claims against any governmental agency, or their employee or agent. (HB 4486) (Passed out of H. Criminal Justice Comm., October 31, 2023). See CHILD USA 10/31 Testimony.

Minnesota

Would expand the gross misdemeanor crime of surreptitious intrusion of minors and adults and extend the criminal SOL to 3 years after the crime or after reporting to police. (HF 111 & SF 294) (HF 111 Passed in House, Mar. 6, 2023).

Would eliminate the civil SOL for sexual abuse of minors and adults by a peace officer against all types of defendants and open a 5-year revival window for expired claims of sexual abuse of minors and adults against a peace officer. (HF 1136).

Mississippi

Would  extend  the civil SOL for CSA, CSAM, and trafficking of minors to age 31 and open a 3-year revival window for expired claims. (HB 1162). 

Would eliminate the civil SOL for CSA, CSAM, and trafficking of minors and persons under the disability of unsoundness of mind. (HB 804).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for felony sexual battery of minors and adults. (SB 2011 & HB 1466).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for felony sexual battery of minors and adults when DNA evidence identifies a perpetrator. (HB 286) (Passed in House, Feb. 15, 2024).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for felony sexual battery of minors and adults. (HB 289).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for sexual battery or fondling of a vulnerable minor or adult. (HB 1323).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for sexual battery of 16 and 17-year olds by a therapist. (HB 1541 & HB 1536).

Missouri

Resolution to amend the Missouri Constitution to permit a retrospective law and eliminate the civil SOL and open a permanent revival window for rape or sodomy of minors and adults, and child sexual abuse claims. (HJR 129).

Resolution to amend the Missouri Constitution to permit a retrospective law and eliminate the civil SOL and open a permanent revival window for rape or sodomy of minors and adults, and child sexual abuse claims. (SJR 88).

Would broaden its civil cause of action for childhood sexual abuse to include more CSA, trafficking, and CSAM crimes and extend the SOL for claims against perpetrators from age 31 to age 41. (HB 1617, SB 1245 & SB 906) (HB 1617 Passed in House, Feb. 21, 2024). See CHILD USA 2/5/24 HB 1617 Testimony.

Would broaden its civil cause of action for childhood sexual abuse to include more CSA and trafficking crimes and extend the SOL for claims against perpetrators from age 31 to age 36. (SB 831).

Would eliminate the civil SOL for CSA against all defendants and open a permanent revival window for expired claims. Would also broaden its civil cause of action for childhood sexual abuse to include more CSA and trafficking crimes and make any nondisclosure or nondisparagement clauses unenforceable.  (SB 933, SB 1063 & SB 1092).

Nebraska

Would eliminate the civil SOL for CSA claims against private non-perpetrator individuals and entities. (LB 174) (Judiciary Comm. Hearing, Feb. 22, 2023). See CHILD USA Testimony.

Would remove sovereign immunity for CSA and extend the SOL against the State and its political subdivisions to age 33 (age of majority, 21, plus 12 years). (LB 341) (Judiciary Comm. Hearing, Feb. 24, 2023). See CHILD USA Testimony.

New Jersey

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for human trafficking, including sex trafficking, of minors and adults. (S 1141 & A 2636).

Would extend the criminal SOL for felony criminal sexual contact and endangering child welfare from age 23 to age 28 (age of majority, 18, plus 10 years) or 2 years from discovery. (SB 1151).

New York

Would eliminate the criminal SOL, extend the civil SOL to age 55, remove the notice of claim requirement, and open a 1-year revival window for sex trafficking offenses committed against minors and adults. (S 349 & A 1940) (S 349 Passed in Senate, May 31, 2023; Died in Assembly, Jan. 3, 2024; Passed out of S. Codes Comm., Jan. 29, 2024) (A 1940 Passed out of Assembly Codes Comm., June 8, 2023). See CHILD USA 2/5/24 S 349 Testimony.

Would eliminate the civil SOL for many child sexual abuse offenses and open a permanent revival window for expired claims. (A 01854 & S 06099).

Would eliminate the criminal and civil SOL for many child sexual abuse crimes. (A 5429).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for all sex offenses against minors and for hindering the prosecution of sex offenses against minors, incest and use of a child in a sexual performance. Would add criminal liability for endangering welfare of a child in the 1st degree, concealing or hindering discovery of child sex abuse or evidence, and broaden criminal liability for non-profits for child sex abuse. Would also open a 3-year revival window for all expired claims, including those governed by an SOL of another jurisdiction, with a provision barring confidential settlements. Would extend the civil SOL where a child sex abuse victim has died from 3 years after death with an upper limit of age 21, to 6 years after death, but no later than age 24. (A 3637).

Would extend the criminal SOL for some CSA crimes to age 33. (S 2910) (Passed out of S. Codes Comm., May 1, 2023).

Ohio

Would extend  the civil SOL for physician sexual abuse and sexual battery offenses to age 30. (SB 109) (S. Judiciary Comm. Hearing, September 20, 2023).

Would extend the criminal SOL for failure to report CSA to age 22. Would add the crime of grooming and set the SOL for felony grooming at age 24 and misdemeanor grooming at age 22. (HB 322) (H. Civil Justice. Comm. Hearing, Dec. 5, 2023 & Feb. 6, 2024). See CHILD USA 12/4 Testimony.

Oklahoma

Amended bill relating to sexual assault nurse would eliminate the criminal SOL for all felony sex crimes against children and adults, including CSAM and trafficking. (SB 993) (Amended in S. Conf. Comm., May 22, 2023).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for sex trafficking of minors and adults and extend DNA tolling of the criminal SOL from 3 to 12 years after DNA identification. (SB 294).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for all felony sex crimes against children, including CSAM and trafficking, and extend the DNA discovery rule for other crimes to 12 years after identification. (SB 716 & SB 1093).

Would extend the civil SOL for childhood sexual abuse or exploitation claims against employers and legal entities from age 20 to age 23. (HB 1539) (Passed in House, Mar. 6, 2023).

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for CSA, trafficking, and CSAM when there is DNA identification or a confession. (SB 1658) (Passed out of S. Judiciary Comm., Feb. 20, 2024).

Pennsylvania

House amended a resolution to propose a single amendment to the Pennsylvania Constitution to add a 2-year revival window for victims of child sex abuse and explicitly lift sovereign immunity for actions against the government. Prior Senate version of the resolution proposed the same amendment alongside 2 others. (SB 1) (Passed in Senate, Jan. 11, 2023; Amended Bill Passed in House, May 22, 2023). See CHILD USA 1/20 Testimony & 3/29 Testimony.

Would eliminate the civil SOL for sexual abuse of minors and adults and open a 2-year window for all expired sexual abuse claims. Would also prohibits non-disclosure agreements for sexual abuse unless a victim requests it. (SB 578).

Rhode Island Would eliminate the civil SOL and open a permanent revival window for CSA and sexual exploitation claims against any party. (HB 7235).
South Carolina Would extend the civil SOL to age 55 or 5 years from discovery and open a 1-year revival window against all types of defendants, including the government. (SB 84).
Tennessee

Would eliminate the civil SOL for child sexual abuse occurring on or after July 1, 2023. (SB 178 & HB 570) (HB 570 H. Civil Justice Subcomm. Hearing, Mar. 21, 2023). See CHILD USA 3/13 Testimony.

Would extend the civil SOL for trafficking of minors occurring on or after July 1, 2024 to age 48 (age of majority, 18, plus 30 years), and for trafficking occurring before that date to 3 years from discovery. (HB 1906 & SB 1801) (HB 1906 H. Civil Justice Subcomm. Hearing, Feb. 20, 2024).

Washington

Would eliminate the civil SOL for child sex abuse and open a permanent revival window for expired claims. (HB 1618) (Passed in House, Mar. 2, 2023; Passed out of S. Law & Justice Comm., Mar. 22, 2023; S. Ways & Means Comm. Hearing, Mar. 30, 2023; Reintroduced Jan. 8, 2024; Passed in House, Jan. 25, 2024; Passed out of S. Judiciary Comm., Feb. 15, 2024; S. Ways & Means Comm. Hearing, Feb. 22, 2024). See CHILD USA 2/3/23 Testimony, 2/14/23 Testimony, 3/17/23 Testimony, 3/29/23 Testimony & 2/22/24 Testimony.

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for first, second, and third degree rape by a first responder of minors and adults. (SB 5937) (Passed in Senate, Feb 12, 2024; Passed out of H. Community Safety Comm., Feb. 20, 2024). See CHILD USA 1/15/24 Testimony &, 2/20/24 Testimony.

Would eliminate the criminal SOL for trafficking crimes, including felony trafficking of a minor, felony commercial sexual abuse of a minor, felony promotion commercial sexual abuse of a minor, felony promoting travel for commercial sexual abuse of a minor, and misdemeanor permitting commercial sexual abuse of a minor. Would extend the civil SOL for the trafficking cause of action by adding a 3-year discovery running from discovery of the act or the connection between their injury and the abuse. (SB 6006) (Passed in Senate, Feb. 7, 2024; Passed out of H. Community Safety Comm., Feb. 20, 2024). See CHILD USA 1/15/24 Testimony, 2/15/24 Testimony, & 2/20/24 Testimony.

Would eliminate the civil SOL and revive childhood sexual abuse claims against a bankruptcy  estate of an organization chartered under federal law, i.e. the Boy Scouts of America. (SB 6046).

West Virginia

Would amend the Computer Crime and Abuse Act to add a civil cause of action for violations, including CSAM, and set the SOL at the earlier of 5 years after the last offense or 2 years after discovery. (HB 4273).

Would eliminate the civil SOL and revive childhood sexual abuse claims against any bankruptcy estate, including the Boy Scouts of America. (SB 308).

 Wisconsin Would extend the civil SOL for sexual contact with a child to age 45 . (SB 302) (S. Mental Health, Substance Abuse Prevention, Children and Families Comm. Hearing, November 1, 2023).
Federal Government

Would remove section 230 immunity for online platforms and app stores for sexual abuse or exploitation of children by intentionally, knowingly, recklessly, or negligently promoting or facilitating online child sexual exploitation, and permit civil claims with no SOL. (S. 1199 STOP CSAM Act of 2023) (Passed out of S. Judiciary Comm., May 11, 2023).

Would remove Section 230 immunity for internet providers if they violate state or federal CSAM laws, and permit civil claims against providers with no SOL. (HR 2732 & S. 1207 EARN IT Act of 2023) (S. 1207 Passed out of S. Judiciary Comm., May 15, 2023)

Would incentivize states to eliminate criminal and civil SOLs for child sex abuse and revive time-barred civil claims. (HR 2920 Statutes of Limitation for Child Sexual Abuse Reform Act).

Total Thirty-One (31) States & the Federal Government are Considering SOL Reform in 2024

 

PART II: OVERVIEW OF JURISDICTIONS WITH THE BEST CRIMINAL AND CIVIL SOL LAWS

Best SOLs

 D. Jurisdictions with No Criminal SOL

click here for summary of criminal sol elimination laws in 44 states, federal government and d.c.
Alabama None for victims abused when they were under 16
Alaska None for victims abused when they were under 18 (felony charge)
Arizona None for victims abused when they were under 15 or under 18 if the abuser is a parent, guardian, teacher or priest or for child sex trafficking
Arkansas None (as of 2013)
California None for felony sex offenses
Colorado None for felony child sexual offenses
Connecticut None for class A felonies and for any offense involving sexual abuse, sexual exploitation or sexual assault of a minor, including risk of injury involving intimate contact with a victim under age 16.
Delaware None
Florida None for felony sexual battery of minors (defined by Fla. Stat. § 794.011)
Georgia None for (1) trafficking a person for sexual servitude; (2) cruelty to children in the first degree; (3) rape; (4) aggravated sodomy; (5) child molestation or aggravated child molestation; (6) enticing a child for indecent purposes; or (7) incest.
Hawaii None for 1st and 2nd degree sexual assault, and continuous sexual assault of a minor under 14
Idaho Elimination for felony sex abuse and lewd conduct with a child.
Illinois None for felonies and misdemeanors
Indiana None if offense committed with threats or use of deadly force (class A)
Iowa None for all child sex abuse felonies and misdemeanors.
Kansas None for rape
Kentucky None for felonies
Louisiana None for prosecutions of crimes for that are punishable by death or life imprisonment, including aggravated rape and forcible rape
Maine None for victim under 16 for felony and misdemeanor incest; unlawful sexual contact; sexual abuse of a minor; rape or gross sexual assault, formerly denominated as gross sexual misconduct.
Maryland None for felonies
Massachusetts None where victim under 16 (after +27 years DNA or other corroborating evidence needed)
Michigan None 1st degree crimes.
Minnesota None for the following felonies: solicitation, inducement, and promotion of prostitution, sex trafficking, and criminal sexual conduct in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th degrees.
Mississippi None if (1) victim was abused during ages 14-16 and offender is 3 years older; (2) victim was abused under 14 and offender 2 years older; (3) victim was abused under 18 and abuser is in a position of authority or trust; or (4) involving touching or handling of children for lustful purposes
Missouri Murder, forcible rape, attempted forcible rape, forcible sodomy, attempted forcible sodomy, or any class A felony
Montana None
Nebraska None for felony 1st or 2nd degree sexual assault, or misdemeanor 3rd degree sexual assault when victim was abused under the age of 16, felony incest, sex trafficking of a minor and child pornography.
New Jersey None for sexual assault or aggravated sexual assault
New Mexico None for 1st degree felonies
New York None for 1st degree felonies
North Carolina None
Pennsylvania None for felony trafficking, sexual servitude, rape, statutory sexual assault, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, sexual assault, institutional sexual assault, aggravated indecent assault and incest.
Rhode Island None for 1st degree sexual assault, and 1st and 2nd degree child molestation
South Carolina None
South Dakota None for class A, B, and C felonies; all child rape & forcible rape
Tennessee None for child sex abuse felonies and misdemeanors
Texas None for most sex crimes against young children
Utah None for rape of a child, object rape of a child, sodomy on a child, sexual abuse of a child, aggravated sexual abuse of a child, human trafficking of a child
Vermont None for aggravated sexual assault and sexual exploitation of a minor
Virginia None for felonies
Washington None for felony rape, sexual misconduct, child molestation, and sexual exploitation of a minor
West Virginia None for sexual assault, 1st degree sexual abuse, sexual abuse by parent, guardian, custodian, or person in a position of trust to child
Wisconsin None for 1st degree sexual assault, or repeated class A or B felony offenses against the same child
Wyoming None
Washington D.C. None for felony sexual abuse, child sexual abuse, sexual abuse of a minor, and incest.
Federal Government None
Total Forty-four (44) States, Federal Government and Washington D.C. Eliminated Criminal SOLs

 

 

E. Jurisdictions with No Civil SOL
(for at least some child sex abuse claims)

click here for summary of civil sol elimination laws in 18 states, federal government and 2 Territories
Alaska None for felony sex abuse of a minor and felony sexual assault (as of 2001), unlawful exploitation of a minor (as of 2003), and felony sex trafficking or felony human trafficking (as of 2013). Applies to claims against perpetrators arising after the effective dates and to non-expired claims arising before. (Alaska Stat. Ann. § 09.10.065).
Arizona None for action based on sex trafficking of minors and adults (as of 2021).  (AZ ST § 12-721).
Arkansas None for sexual abuse of minors and adults with disabilities. (SB 204).
California None for CSA claims arising on and after January 1, 2024. (AB 452).
Colorado None for sexual assault of minors and adults.  Applies to claims against all defendants arising after the effective date and to non-expired claims arising before (as of 2021). (SB21-073, 73rd General Assembly, 1st Reg. Sess. (2021)). Also, none for new cause of action for sexual misconduct with minors. Applies to claims against perpetrators, private institutions, and government for abuse in 2022 or later (as of 2022). (SB21-088, 73rd General Assembly, 1st Reg. Sess. (2021)).
Connecticut None if events forming the civil claim led to conviction of first-degree aggravated sexual assault or sexual assault. Applies to any cause of action arising from an incident committed prior to, on or after May 23, 2002. (Conn. Gen. Stat. § 52-577e).
Delaware None for action based on sexual abuse of a minor by an adult. Effective as of July 10, 2007 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (Del. Code tit. 10, § 8145).
Florida None for sexual battery offenses committed against victims under 16 years old. Effective as of July 1, 2010 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (Fla. Stat. Ann. § 95.11).
Guam None for action based on child sexual abuse. Effective as of September 23, 2016 and it is fully retroactive, applying to call claims arising before on or after that date. (GU ST T. 7, § 11301.1).
Illinois None for action based on childhood sexual abuse. Effective as of January 1, 2014 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (IL ST CH 735 § 5/13-202.2).
Louisiana None for actions based on sexual abuse of a minor. Effective June 14, 2021 and applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (2021 La. Sess. Law Serv. Act 322 (H.B. 492)).
Maine None for action based on sexual contact or sexual act with a minor. Effective as of April 7, 2000 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (ME ST T. 14 § 752-C).
Maryland None for sexual abuse of a minor.  (HB 1 & SB 686)
Minnesota None for action based on sexual abuse of a minor. Effective as of May 25, 2013 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (Minn. Stat. § 541.073(b)).
Nebraska None for action based on sexual assault of a child against a perpetrator. Effective as of August 24, 2017 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (Neb. Rev. St. § 25-228).
Nevada None for action based on child sex abuse against a perpetrator where there is clear and convincing evidence of the abuse. (Petersen v. Bruen, 106 Nev. 271, 281 (1990)). None for claims against a perpetrator or someone criminally liable for sexual abuse or exploitation of a minor (including trafficking, prostitution, and pornography) and a promoter, possessor, or viewer of CSAM (child sexual abuse material). Effective as of June 2, 2021, and it is fully retroactive, applying to all claims arising before on or after that date. (2021 Nevada Laws Ch. 288 (S.B. 203)).
New Hampshire None for action based on sexual assault or related offenses against minors and adults. Effective as of September 18, 2020. (NH ST § 508:4-g).
Northern Mariana Islands None for action based on child sexual abuse. Effective as of November 10, 2021, and it is fully retroactive, applying to call claims arising before on or after that date.  (2021 N.M.I. Pub. L. No. 22-12 (HB 22-2, SDI)).
Utah None for action based on intentional or negligent sexual abuse of a minor against a perpetrator. Effective as of March 23, 2015. (Utah Code § 78B-2-308).
Vermont None for action based on childhood sexual abuse. Effective as of July 1, 2019 and it is fully retroactive, applying to all claims arising before or on or after that date. (VT. STAT. ANN TIT. 12, § 522).
Federal Government None for offenses against minors, including child sex abuse, sex trafficking, exploitation, and CSAM. Effective September 16, 2022 and also applies to non-expired claims arising before that date. (S 3103 Eliminating Limits to Justice for Child Sex Abuse Victims Act of 2022).
Total  Eighteen (18) States, Federal Government, and Two (2) Territories Eliminated Civil SOLs
2020 Civil Age Cap Ranking

 F. Jurisdictions that Revived Expired Civil SOL
(opened revival window or revived up to a certain age)

click here for summary of civil revival laws in 27 states and 3 Territories
Arizona (2019-20) 19-month window opened on May 27, 2019 for expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government and closed on December 31, 2020 – closed. Also revived SOL up to age 30. (AZ ST § 12-514; H.B. 2466, 54th Leg., 1st Reg. Sess. (Ariz. 2019)).
Arkansas (2022-23) 2-year window opened February 1, 2022 for expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – closed early on July 31, 2023. (ARK. CODE ANN. § 16-118-118).

(2024-26) 2-year window opens on February 1, 2024 for expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – opening soon. (SB 204).

California (2003-04) 1-year window revived SOL against private organizations only – closed. (Cal. Civ. Proc. Code § 340.1).

(2020-22) 3-year revival window opened on January 1, 2020 for expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – open. Also revives SOL up to age 40. (Cal. Civ. Proc. Code § 340.1).

Colorado* (2022-25) 3-year window opened on January 1, 2022 for claims of abuse occurring from 1960-2021 against perpetrators, private organizations and government, subject to damages caps – open.  Colorado’s new cause of action is not a revival law, but it is included in this section because it opens a window to justice for many survivors whose common law claims have expired. (SB21-088, 73rd General Assembly, 1st Reg. Sess. (2021)).
Connecticut (2002) Revives SOL up to age 48 against perpetrators, private organizations and government. (Conn. Gen. Stat. § 52-577d).
Delaware (2007-09) 2-year window revived SOL against perpetrators, private organizations and government – closed. (Del. Code tit. 10, § 8145).

(2010-12) Added 2-year window for healthcare providers because original window did not apply to claims against them – closed. (Del. Code tit. 18, § 6856).

Georgia (2015-17) 2-year window revived SOL against perpetrators only – closed. (Ga. Code § 9-3-33.1).
Guam (2011) 2-year window revived SOL against their abusers – closed. (7 G.C.A. § 11306(2)).

(2016) Permanently revives all expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – open. (tit. 7 G.C.A. § 11301.1(b)).

Hawaii (2012-14) 2-year window revived SOL against perpetrators and private organizations – closed. (Haw. Rev. Stat. § 657-1.8).

(2014-16) Extended original window for another 2 years and expanded to include claims against the government – closed. (Haw. Rev. Stat. § 657-1.8).

(2018-20) Extended window was open until April 24, 2020 – closed. (Haw. Rev. Stat. § 657-1.8).

Kansas (2023) Revives SOL up to age 31 or 3 years after criminal conviction.  (S. Sub for HB 2127).
Kentucky (2021) Revives SOL up to 5 years after the date the SOL expired. (2021 Kentucky Laws Ch. 89 (HB 472)).
Louisiana (2021) 3-year window revives SOL against any party – open. (2021 La. Sess. Law Serv. Act 322 (H.B. 492)).
Maine (2021) Permanently revives all expired claims against any party – open. (ME ST T. 14 § 752-C).
Maryland (2023)  Permanently revives all expired claims against any party – open. (HB 1 & SB 686).
Massachusetts (2014) Revives SOL up to age 53 against perpetrators only. (Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 260, § 4C; 2014 Mass. Legis. Serv. Ch. 145 (H.B. 4126)).
Michigan (2018) 90-day window revived SOL for victims of Larry Nassar only – closed. (Mich. Comp. Laws § 600.5851b).
Minnesota (2013-16) 3-year window revived SOL against perpetrators and private organizations – closed. (Minn. Stat. § 541.073, 2013 Minn. Sess. Law Serv. Ch. 89 (H.F. 681)).
Montana (2019-20) 1-year window opened on May 7, 2019 for expired claims against perpetrators and entities – closed. Also revives SOL up to age 27. (Mont. Code § 27-2-216).
Nevada (2021) Permanently revives all expired claims against perpetrators or persons criminally liable for sexual abuse or exploitation of a minor (including trafficking, prostitution, and pornography) and promoters, possessors, or viewers of CSAM (child sexual abuse material) – open. Also, revives SOL up to age 38 for sexual abuse or exploitation of a minor against other defendants, with treble damages recoverable for participating in or covering up the abuse. (2021 Nevada Laws Ch. 288 (S.B. 203)).
New Jersey (2019-21) 2-year window opened on December 1, 2019 for expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – closed. Window applies to child sex abuse victims and those sexually assaulted as adults. Also revives SOL up to age 55. (2019 NJ Sess. Law Serv. Ch. 120 (SENATE 477)).
New York (2019-20) 1-year window opened on August 14, 2019 for expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – closed. (2019 Sess. Law News of N.Y. Ch. 11 (S. 2440)).

(2020-21) Extended window via executive order (Executive Order No. 202.29) and then again with a 1-year window extension law keeping window open until August 14, 2021. (N.Y. C.P.L.R. 214-g; S.B. 7082, 2020 Leg., Reg. Sess. (N.Y. 2020)).

(2023-25) 2-Year window for expired gender-motivated violence, including CSA and sexual assault claims, will open on March 1, 2023 against all types of defendants for abuse that occurred in New York City—Manhattan,  Queens, Staten Island, Brooklyn, and the Bronx. (Am. L.L. 2022/021, eff. 1/9/2022).

North Carolina (2020-21) 2-year window opened on January 1, 2020 for expired civil claims – closed. (2019 North Carolina Laws S.L. 2019-245 (S.B. 199)).
Northern Mariana Islands (2021) Permanently revives all expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – open. (2021 N.M.I. Pub. L. No. 22-12 (HB 22-2, SDI)).
Ohio (2023) 5-year window opened on October 12, 2023 for expired claims against the bankruptcy estate of the Boy Scouts of America. (HB 35). 
Oregon (2010) Revives SOL up to age 40 against perpetrators and private organizations. (O.R.S. § 12.117).
Rhode Island (2019) Revives SOL up to age 53 against perpetrator only. (RI ST § 9-1-51).
Utah* (2016) Permanently revived SOL up to age 53 against perpetrators or persons criminally liable and 3-year window opened on May 10, 2016 for expired claims against perpetrators and persons criminally liable. The revival law is not in effect because it was held unconstitutional in 2020. (Utah Code Ann. § 78B-2-308).
Vermont (2019) Permanently revives all expired claims against perpetrators, private organizations and government – open. (VT. STAT. ANN TIT. 12, § 522).
West Virginia (2020) Revives SOL up to age 36 against perpetrators and private organizations. (W.V. Code §55-2-15).
Washington D.C. (2019-21) 2-year window opened on May 3, 2019 for expired claims against perpetrators and entities – closed. Window applies to all child sex abuse victims up to age 40 or those who discovered their abuse less than 5 years ago, and in some circumstances, those sexually assaulted as adults. (D.C. Code § 12-301).
Total Twenty-Seven (27) States and Three (3) Territories Revived Expired Civil SOLs